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The full catalog of courses offered by Heartfelt Homeschool.
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Professional Development Workshops for Parent-Teachers
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Executive Function Skills for Adults Image
225
Single-Subject Mastery Courses
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Adulting: Meal Planning 101 Image
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Full Year Core Courses
Project-Based Foundational Math for Lower Elementary: Active Learning Course
275
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Project-Based Foundational Math for Lower Elementary: Active Learning Course Image
Meets for 30 minutes twice per week for 21 weeks. If you’re looking for a fun, interactive, all-inclusive math course for K-3rd grade math, this is it! The activities in this class get your children thinking and behaving like REAL mathematicians and engineers. If you’re looking to build strong math literacy, fluency, problem-solving skills and metacognition in your children, this is a great foundational class. I don’t provide lectures, but I do introduce Socratic-style discussion in order to help kids learn HOW to think, not WHAT to think. Projects are assigned and discussed to ensure learners fully comprehend each topic I’ll provide printables, videos, projects, and everything needed to have a successful year of math; you’ll provide a few extra elements for in-person activities. These items depend on what your learner chooses. Most projects will be worked on in class, time permitting, but some may be done outside of class. These projects are things like creating a chart to show favorite ice cream flavours in the learner’s family, a poster showing a learner’s routine using clocks, etc. Learners are expected to do the majority of this work: parents are not to step in and “finish” or “perfect” the work. I do not care about perfection; I’m looking for specific benchmarks in relation to what we’re studying, and none of these are to be met by the parents. If you have further questions, please email me at heartfelthomeschool@gmail.com In class, I’ll use slides and handouts in addition to oral presentation to introduce concepts and information to learners. We will record information as we go along, and some will be recorded on printables. I’ll have virtual flashcards to use to review outside of class. Virtual math labs can be completed as well. I will have printables and worksheets available for each concept. In class, expect your child to use manipulatives for each concept. Many of my learners use things like small toy cars and trucks, blocks, Tangram (pattern blocks), My Little Pony figurines, toy animals, etc. If you have specific manipulatives to use, that’s fine, otherwise whatever you already have will be great. I’ve even seen the plastic lids from baby food pouches, milk cartons, and more! I will provide printable copies of a clock and fake money to use for these classes, but if you already have these in your home, you’re welcome to use these. The goal of this course is to use what we already have to show kids how we use math on a daily basis through hands-on, project-based education! Note about the “exams”: these are informal but can be administrated formally upon request. The basic idea is to ensure learners are able to understand what we’ve covered so far, and I can assess if extra practice is needed for any skill.
Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester I
395
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Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester I Image
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, twice per week, for 20 weeks. 
If you’re looking for a fun, interactive, all-inclusive math course for grades 4-9 math, this is it! The activities in this class get your children thinking and behaving like REAL mathematicians and engineers. If you’re looking to build strong math literacy, fluency, problem-solving skills and metacognition in your children, this is a great foundational class. I don’t provide lectures, but I do introduce Socratic-style discussion in order to help kids learn HOW to think, not WHAT to think. Projects are assigned and discussed to ensure learners fully comprehend each topic I’ll provide printables, videos, projects, and everything needed to have a successful year of math; you’ll provide a few extra elements for in-person activities. These items depend on what your learner chooses. Most projects will be worked on in class, time permitting, but some may be done outside of class. In class, I’ll use slides and handouts in addition to oral presentation to introduce concepts and information to learners. We will record some as we go along, and some will be recorded on printables. I’ll have virtual flashcards to use to review outside of class. Virtual math labs can be completed as well. While we do have 40 classes, the first is an introduction class to the entire course. I will have printables and worksheets available for each concept.  
ELA, Composition, and Literature Upper Elementary Full Year Curriculum
375
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ELA, Composition, and Literature Upper Elementary Full Year Curriculum Image
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, twice per week, for twenty weeks.  This is a comprehensive course for grades 4-7. Older/younger learners may benefit as well; if you’re unsure, please email me. Learners will have printables each day, given in a weekly format to complete as time allows and turned in before the following week begins. Homework is assigned on an as-needed basis. Novel reading will be done outside of class, but we will have discussions each week to ensure comprehension for all learners. Learners will track their reading process on Biblionasium, which will not have an additional cost for you. Audiobooks and a scribing service are allowed in this course. Accommodations will be made for learners with special needs. Learners will complete a book quilt, illustrating the novels we read each month, to share with their classmates. At the end of the course, learners will have the opportunity to share the completed quilt with their classmates. Please read over the Writing Portfolio tab for information about how that works. During class, we will cover the daily tasks as outlined below. Outside of live meetings, learners are to complete the work as assigned. A full syllabus will be provided prior to classes beginning. Each week, we will meet twice. Regardless which days we are scheduled to meet live, the same schedule for work and assignments will apply. The anticipated weekly outline will be as follows: Day 1: Spelling/Vocabulary list introduction; Day 2: Novel Introduction or Review Day 3: Part of speech; figurative language Day 4: Writer’s Workshop (this is where we will work through our writing pieces-if you have questions about how this portion will work, please review the Writing Portfolio tab above); Part of Speech practice (each week focuses on a different part of speech.) Day 5: Poetry 101: We will cover a different portion of this class each week, and write poetry as well.
ELA & Literature Full Curriculum: Middle School & Early Highschool
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ELA & Literature Full Curriculum: Middle School & Early Highschool Image
If you’re looking for an all-inclusive, comprehensive English/Language Arts curriculum for your child, this is it! Literature, writing portfolio, SAT prep, parts of speech, figurative language, poetry, and SO much more is included in this fantastic class! Can be a Flex class!
Meets for 45-55 minutes per meeting, twice per week for 20 weeks
This is a comprehensive course for grades 6/7-10. Older/younger learners may benefit as well; if you’re unsure, please email me. Learners will have printables each day, given in a weekly packet format to complete as time allows and turned in before the following week begins. Homework is assigned on an as-needed basis. Novel reading will be done outside of class, but we will have discussions each week to ensure comprehension for all learners. Learners will track their reading process on Biblionasium, which will not have an additional cost for you. Audiobooks and a scribing service are allowed in this course. Accommodations will be made for learners with special needs. Learners will complete a book quilt, illustrating the novels we read each month, to share with their classmates. At the end of the course, learners will have the opportunity to share the completed quilt with their classmates. During class, we will cover the daily tasks as outlined below. Outside of live meetings, learners are to complete the work as assigned. A full syllabus will be provided prior to classes beginning. Each week, we will meet twice. Regardless which days we are scheduled to meet live, the same schedule for work and assignments will apply. The anticipated weekly outline will be as follows: -Monday: Introduction to spelling and comprehension words; quote and author of the week discussion. -Tuesday: Figurative Language; novel discussion -Wednesday: Writer’s Workshop (this is where we will work through our writing pieces-if you have questions about how this portion will work, please review my Portfolio course here as the writing portion of this course will run similarly); Part of Speech practice (each of the first four months will focus on 1-2 parts of speech) -Thursday: SAT Reading Comprehension practice -Friday: Current events presentation; spelling/comprehension quiz; homework catch-up and help as needed. Anticipated course outline:
  Month 1:  -Novel 1: Lilies of the Field by William Barrett; Novel 2: That Was Then, This is Now by S.E. Hinton -Part of Speech: noun, pronoun -Figurative Language: simile, metaphor, alliteration and assonance -Writing pieces: (Introduction to the writing process); narrative/autobiography, expository -Book quilt pieces 1 and 2
Month 2:  -Novel 1: And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie; Novel 2: Pigman by Frank Zindel -Part of Speech: adjectives, verbs -Figurative Language: personification, onomatopoeia -Writing pieces: Research Reports, Persuasive -Book quilt pieces 3 and 4 Month 3:  -Novel 1: Shane by Louis L’Amour; Animal Farm by George Orwell -Part of Speech: adverbs/ helping verbs/linking verbs -Figurative Language: idioms, hyperbole -Writing pieces: Creative, Technical Documents (Engineering) -Book quilt pieces 5 and 6 Month 4: -Novel 1: Night by Elie Wiesel; Novel 2: Diary of Anne Frank -Part of Speech: Review -Figurative Language: Review -Writing pieces: Responses to Literature (Research paper on a feature of the Holocaust), Speech Writing -Book quilt pieces 7 and 8 Month 5: -Novel 1: The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare; Novel 2: The Crucible by Arthur Miller -Poetry 101: Learners will receive my Poetry 101 course included in this course at no extra cost! -Freedom Writers -Writing pieces: Finishing portfolio -Book quilt pieces 9 and 10 If you’d like to take this as a flex class (no live meetings), this is permitted. Because this course requires attendance and attention, it is incumbent upon you to ensure your child attends each class, turns in all of their work on time, and completes the writing portion as outlined. I will assist in this, but a portion of this course does take place outside of class time. Guidelines and instruction are given for any work completed outside of live meetings. In short: learners must do the work to complete the this class successfully. I cannot guarantee a completed portfolio, because the work depends on the learner. I will do my very best, but learners who do not attend classes and complete work as assigned are much less likely to be successful than those who do. I’ve been teaching language arts, writing, novel studies, and all things English for a few years. During this time, I’ve successfully worked with hundreds of learners who “hate” writing, “hate” reading, and “hate English class”. Somehow, they almost always walk away after the course with the opposite feelings toward English classes! I really enjoy all aspects of this class and the journey we take together. Please join me as I bring ELA, writing, and more to life in this class! Course materials: .PDF copies will be provided of all novels when legally possible. Learners may purchase copies of books or borrow them from the library for free. Learners will also need: A binder-2″ is ideal Notebook paper Notebook Dividers Pencil/ Enclosed Pencil Sharpener Pens (Blue/Black Ink) Highlighters
Session dates and times: Tue Aug 28, 2018 – Mar 13, 2019 at 4pm Eastern Full Course Schedule: Tue Aug 28, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Aug 29, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Sep 4, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Sep 5, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Sep 12, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Sep 18, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Sep 19, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Sep 25, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Sep 26, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Oct 2, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Oct 3, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Oct 16, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Oct 17, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Oct 23, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Oct 24, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Oct 30, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Nov 6, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Nov 7, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Nov 13, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Nov 14, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Nov 27, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Nov 28, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Dec 4, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Dec 5, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Dec 11, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Dec 12, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Dec 18, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Dec 19, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Jan 8, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Jan 9, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Jan 15, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Jan 16, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Jan 22, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Jan 23, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Tue Feb 5, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Feb 6, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Feb 13, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Feb 20, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Mar 6, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern Wed Mar 13, 2019, 4pm – 4:40pm Eastern
College Preparatory: American Literature
399
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College Preparatory: American Literature Image
Students will gain an understanding of the development of literature and will practice the skills of close literary analysis through evaluative writing. Meets for 50 minutes per meeting, twice per week, for 15 weeks.  American Literature is a college-preparatory literature and composition course. Focus works, including novels, short stories, poems, and drama, have been selected for literary quality, and for their place in the historical development of literature. Context readings provide background information about the author, the historical period, and the literary and artistic context of the focus work. As this is a college-preparatory course, a syllabus will be provided with a grading rubric and more information about each essay. Essay writing is required: narrative/personal, persuasive, expository, and descriptive essays will be written throughout this course. I have provided digital copies of all works below, including the literary pieces we will studies. Students are allowed to have their own hard copies if they’d prefer. The literary pieces do not need to be printed but all other uploads should be. What is American Literature? (handout provided to read aloud during class) Class 1: Overview Class 2: Multiculturalism Class 3: Material Culture: architecture, religion, politics, music Class 4: Psychology: cultural geography, folklore, anthropology Each of the above classes will have questions discussed orally to go along with each reading. Essay Writing Portion: Class 5: Introduction of an Essay (handout provided to read aloud during class) Narrative/Personal Essay (handout provided to read aloud during class) Class 6: Thesis statement; brainstorming and identifying three parameters; Outline your five paragraph essay; Homework: draft writing Class 7: Draft Presentation and editing; Homework: rewriting; Publish final copy Persuasive Essay (handout provided to read aloud during class) Class 8: Thesis statement; Brainstorming and identifying three parameters; Outline your five paragraph essay; Homework: draft writing Class 9: Draft Presentation and editing; Homework: rewriting; Publish final copy Expository Essay Class 10: Thesis statement; Brainstorming and identifying three parameters; Outline your five paragraph essay; Homework: draft writing Class 11: Draft Presentation and editing; Homework: rewriting; Publish final copy Descriptive Essay Class 12: Thesis statement; Brainstorming and identifying three parameters; Outline your five paragraph essay; Homework: draft writing Class 13 Draft Presentation and editing; Homework: rewriting; Publish final copy Class 14: Review book selections below; choose 3 Class 15: Book 1 Presentation Class 16: Book progress check in only (this class may be shorter than the others) Class 17: Book 2 Presentation Class 18: Book progress check in only (this class may be shorter than the others) Class 19: Book 3 Presentation Class 20: Book progress check in and overall evaluation of the course; Final taken online and results will be messaged to each parent within 10 days of the conclusion of the course. Independent Reading List (choose 3): Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper The House of Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne Moby Dick by Herman Melville The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway By the end of the course, students will: -Possess a broad knowledge of the history and development of American literature. -Have specific understanding of selected representative texts by major authors of the periods studied. -Have a general understanding of the historical and cultural contexts of the works. -Be able to analyze literary texts and present thoughtfully developed ideas in writing. -Demonstrate competence in essay organization, style, and mechanics.
Meeting Dates and Times: Mon Sep 10, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Sep 12, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Sep 17, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Sep 19, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Sep 24, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Sep 26, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Oct 1, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Oct 3, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Oct 8, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Oct 10, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Oct 17, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Oct 22, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Oct 24, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Oct 29, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Nov 5, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Nov 7, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Nov 12, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Nov 14, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Nov 26, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Nov 28, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Dec 3, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Dec 5, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Dec 10, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Dec 12, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Dec 17, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Dec 19, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Jan 9, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Jan 14, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Jan 16, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Jan 21, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Jan 23, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Jan 28, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Jan 30, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Feb 4, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Feb 6, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Feb 11, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Feb 13, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Feb 18, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Wed Feb 20, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern Mon Feb 25, 2019, 4:45pm – 5:35pm Eastern
Upper Grades U.S. History (APUSH)
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Upper Grades U.S. History (APUSH) Image
This is a full year of a traditional APUSH (Advanced Placement United States History) level course covered in about 3 months’ time, and is designed to help prepare learners for higher-level courses, or act as a college prep course for the APUSH exam. Meets for one hour per meeting, twice per week, for 13 weeks.  I have prepared Powerpoint Slideshow presentations I’ll screenshare, to introduce information for each of the nine units we will study. Learners are also provided with a “survival guide” that can be used with the quiz-taking portion at the end of each unit. Quizzes and the review are all open-notes. They’re set up to be taken on Google forms, and I will grade then submit final scores into the classroom. Learners and I will read all slides aloud in a round robin fashion. We will discuss key points as we go along. Each class is one hour long, a total of 26 hours in class. The AP U.S. History Exam measures students’ knowledge of U.S. history and their ability to think historically. Questions are based on key and supporting concepts, course themes, and the disciplinary practices and reasoning skills outlined in the course and exam description. While this is considered an AP level course due to the speed, critical thinking required, and how thorough it is, this course is suitable for learners who don’t want or need AP courses. However, this course is designed to cover much of the information necessary to pass the exam. You can read more about the exam here: https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-united-states-history/exam?course=ap-united-states-history Beginning on page 140 of this document, you can see a sample APUSH exam for reference: https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pdf/ap-us-history-course-and-exam-description.pdf?course=ap-united-states-history Class 1: Introduction to the course and my classroom Class 2: Unit 1: The Colonial Era Class 3: Unit 1: The Colonial Era Class 4: Unit 1: The Colonial Era; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 5: Unit 2: Revolution to Constitution Class 6: Unit 2: Revolution to Constitution Class 7: Unit 2: Revolution to Constitution Class 8: Unit 2: Revolution to Constitution; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 9: Unit 3: Creating a Nation Class 10: Unit 3: Creating a Nation; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 11: Unit 4: A Divided Nation Class 12: Unit 4: A Divided Nation (has a homework activity) Class 13: Unit 4: A Divided Nation; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 14: Unit 5: Expansion and Reform (has a homework activity) Class 15: Unit 5: Expansion and Reform (has a homework activity) Class 16: Unit 5: Expansion and Reform (has a homework activity) Class 17: Unit 5: Expansion and Reform; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 18: Unit 6: Becoming a World Power Class 19: Unit 6: Becoming a World Power; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 20: Unit 7: National Crisis Class 21: Unit 7: National Crisis Class 22: Unit 7: National Crisis ; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 23: Unit 8: America as a World Power Class 24: Unit 8: America as a World Power; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 25: Unit 9: Recreating a Political Identity; Google forms open-notes unit quiz to be taken after class Class 26: Oral review of entire course taken during class to be followed by the Google forms open-notes full course test to be taken after class
Poetry 201: Introduction, Exploration, and Expansion
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Poetry 201: Introduction, Exploration, and Expansion Image
Meets for 45 minutes per class, twice per week for 20 weeks. Learners who wish to enroll in 201 and have not completed 101 will need to message me before enrollment. I do this so I can ensure learners have a solid foundation before continuing. GOALS: (1) to introduce learners to some of the achievements of poets writing in English (2) to help learners become a discriminating and confident reader of poetry on their own, someone who is not afraid to seek out the poems published in, say, the latest New Yorker and who can read them with understanding and enjoyment. This is NOT a course in poetry writing. By the end of the course, learners will find that poetry, though often difficult and demanding, can offer intense and complex pleasure–emotional, imaginative, and intellectual. Learners will better understand what poetry is and what kind of responses it invites from its readers, realizing that poetry is not just a prose idea cast into “secret code” or dressed in fancy clothes by a poet who could have made the point more directly. We’ll read aloud, round-robin style, a wide range of poems from different historical periods, written in a varied range of forms and styles. The first of eight parts of the course will tend to emphasize the many elements of poetry and serve as a refresher of our 101 course—imagery, figurative language, tone, sound and rhythm, and so on. In the second part, we’ll spend more time considering what we can learn from studying a poem in the context of other poems by the same author or poems on a similar subject. Finally, the course also aims to help learners further develop their skills in analysis and writing. I’ll sometimes give brief lectures, but this course relies largely on discussion. Learners will be expected to do much of the talking. Response by typing is acceptable. Homework will be assigned as noted on the anticipated course syllabus below. Learners will write three papers on various topics; this will take place over three weeks for each paper. Additionally, learners will make a presentation, and will have six weeks to complete this. A midterm will be given during Class 21, and a final exam during Class 40. Both will be graded and a rubric will be presented at least one week prior to the exams.
Gift Certificate
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Looking for a gift that keeps giving? Why not fund education?! With my gift certificates, families can purchase in any amount $10-$500, which can be redeemed for classes, courses, and workshops on my site. Kids already have enough STUFF, so why not gift them something that doesn't take up space and provides a wonderful experience up to a year long?
Hogwarts For Muggles
Welcome to Hogwarts!
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Welcome to Hogwarts! Image
Meets once for 90-120 minutes. One of my favorite quotes from Harry Potter is by Dumbledore: “Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if only one remembers to turn on the light.” Many of my learners love this series, and this quote has really guided me and helped me not only as a teacher, but also as a person. I would LOVE to share what I’ve learned with your children! In this class, we will do just that. Learners will need to create a free account to Pottermore.com to use during class. Learners may go ahead and get sorted, choose a wand, and discover their Patronus before class if they’d like, or we will do this during class. We will discuss what each house stands for, what the wands mean, and how a Patronus is used in the story. We will also discuss a brief overview of each of the books and learners can add in their favorite parts if they’ve read the series or seen the movies. Learners are not required to have seen the movies or read the books prior to this class. The storyline will be introduced in a way that even those unfamiliar with the Wizard world will understand what we discuss and be able to contribute. I’ll introduce the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry to the learners, and we will then go over the different courses available at Hogwarts, and I’ll introduce my Outschool versions of these courses. I’ll also have free printables available in the Canvas classroom that we can complete in class that relate to my courses. Harry Potter Sudoku that’s from my Arithmancy class, positive self talk (defeating Dementors using your Patronus) from Defense Against the Dark Arts, Herbology: comparing Muggle herbs to Wizarding World herbs, a potions experiment straight from Snape’s Potions class, a fortune teller from Divination, and more! We will discuss 35 different foods in the Wizarding world, and learners will even be able to create their own Harry Potter feast using the menu I provide! I will show photos of my version of the chocolate cake Hagrid gave Harry for his 11th birthday, including a recipe, which learners are welcome to recreate during class. Learners will gain familiarity with my teaching style and interaction, and will see how I use the story of Harry Potter to teach things they need to know in ways that make them want to learn–a key component in education! This is a great way for reluctant learners to gain understanding of key concepts in various subjects while being immersed in a magical world, so it doesn’t feel like learning at all! I’m a hardcore HP fan. As much as I love the Wizarding world, I LOVE using what already interests kids to teach them what they need to know even more! I came up with the original ideas for this series of classes many years ago, so I have an incredible amount of experience teaching them both in-person and online. Come learn all about the ways we can use Harry Potter and the Wizarding World to teach young people from the originator of the Muggle version of Hogwarts!
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Sprout's Herbology
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Sprout
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  Herbology is a mandatory class at Hogwarts for the first five years of a student's education. Students spend class time learning about the different varieties of magical plants that exist. The further into a student's education the class goes, the more difficult and dangerous the plants become. During this class, we will study some of the magical plants in the Harry Potter series, as well as learn about real plants. I'll use the series to help encourage learners to study plants, their parts and functions, and more listed below. A combination of written/oral information, videos, and slideshows will be used to convey necessary information. This is NOT a lecture and IS discussion based--active learning is the best learning! I’m a hardcore HP fan. As much as I love the Wizarding world, I LOVE using what already interests kids to teach them what they need to know even more! I came up with the original ideas for this series of classes many years ago, so I have an incredible amount of experience teaching them both in-person and online. Come learn all about the ways we can use Harry Potter and the Wizarding World to teach young people from the originator of the Muggle version of Hogwarts!
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Hagrid's Care of Magical Creatures
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Hagrid
Meets for 40 minutes twice per week for 13 weeks. Classification and taxonomy are a very important component to the field and this subject will be the foundation of the course. The class will give learners a general survey of the animal kingdom from single cell life forms to complex organisms. Course Goals: -Understand the 6 Kingdom and 3 Domain systems of classifications -Be able to classify various organisms and separate, sort, and differentiate them into various phyla groups. -Be able to distinguish how different organisms are put together and how their internal systems function in those organisms -Verify how various kinds of organisms interact with their chemical, physical, and biological environments. -Develop and refine abilities to make accurate and precise observations and measurements of organisms. -Convey scientific findings in detailed notes that include quality, accurate, and well-labeled illustrations. -Be able to defend and recommend the need for biological diversity in individual ecosystems and on planet Earth as a whole. For each of the creatures, we will study the Ministry of Magic (M.O.M.) Classification, sort into phyla groups, describe its natural habitat, discuss its habits, temperament, and relationship to humans, list its magical properties, explain the care and feeding of the creature, and see if we can find a non-magical Muggle world version of the creature.
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Burbage's Muggle Studies
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Burbage
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 10 weeks.  In this course, I'll use the HP world to help learners gain an understanding of both physical geography and human geography using a combination of slideshows, videos, printables, and oral presentation. It is NOT required that learners have read the books or seen the movies. If you're looking for a fun, interactive, interesting, and comprehensive geography course, my course is here to help! Here are our Key Concepts: -Introduction to Geography -Physical Geography: The Earth and Landforms -Physical Geography: Physical Systems -Human Geography: Culture -Human Geography: Government, Economics, and Religion -Human Interactions with the Earth and Environment -Choices have consequences. -Individuals have rights and responsibilities. -Societies are shaped by beliefs, idea, and diversity. -Relationships between people, place, idea, and environments are dynamic. -Societies experience continuity and change over time.
Hogwarts for Muggles: The Ministry of Magic
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Hogwarts for Muggles: The Ministry of Magic Image
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 6 weeks. “Civic education is critical,” says Marcie Taylor-Thoma, vice chairperson of the Maryland Commission for Civic Literacy, which was created in 1997 to promote civic education by developing programs to educate students and by preparing resources to assist civics educators. “We believe people really need to be involved in their communities rather than be apathetic,” says Taylor-Thoma. “There’s a tie in to participation that comes from learning about civics at a young age and through higher education. Successful people are those who understand how government works and what it means to be a citizen.” During this course, I will use a combination of videos, slideshows, handouts, and oral presentation to help learners gain a solid understanding of the topics below. We have a topic question which will be answered during class. Each class, except the last, will require a short writing exercise completed during class (time permitting) related to the topic question. Learners will share their writing with the class; I can read for those who would prefer.  
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Flitwicks' Charms
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Flitwicks
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 8 weeks.  This is a great course for those who didn't understand grammar previously, those who still get stuck, or those who have never studied grammar before. Our first 8 classes will be parts of speech and sentence structure introduction for those who are unfamiliar and review for those who have previously studied. Then, we will use our next class to combine what we've learned to write journal entries. Learners will use their favorite Harry Potter character as the "author" of a journal entry in past tense. Learners will then rewrite this in present tense, and then in future tense. We will read each learner's entry aloud each time. I can read for those who would prefer to not read aloud. I'll use a combination of slide shows, handouts, videos, and oral discussion to help learners gain a solid understanding of these topics. We will use different entries written by J.K. Rowling for each class, although we may revisit some of our previous entries if needed.
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Binns' History of Magic
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Binns
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 8 weeks.  When you hear the words, ‘A History of Magic’, what is immediately conjured up in your mind? Do you think of dusty tomes, full of pictures of witches on broomsticks wearing pointy hats? Do you think of magicians pulling rabbits out of hats, or of potions being brewed up in bubbling cauldrons? Did you know, for instance, that the art of alchemy — central to the story of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone — has been practiced worldwide and dates back at least to the time of the ancient Egyptians? Alchemy is the science of turning what are known as ‘base metals’ into ‘noble’ ones, in particular gold, and of creating an elixir that leads to immortal life. In The Philosopher’s Stone, Nicolas Flamel was the only known maker of the Stone in question and, aged 665, was living quietly with his wife in Devon. In this course, we will spend the first four weeks studying the magical events in the Harry Potter series. Since a copy of A History of Magic by Bathilda Bagshot is unlikely to fall into our hands, we're going to use some information I've prepared to learn about some of these events in the wizarding world. During each of these classes, we will study the events listed, and discuss the characters, characteristics, and more for each event, and predict what could have happened had things turned out differently. Our last four classes will center around present-day magic. We will discuss similarities and differences between Harry Potter magic and Present Day magic, and more. During this course, I'll use a combination of printables, videos, slideshows, and more to aid in discussion and information presentation. I'll also screenshare my copy of Harry Potter: A Journey Through a History of Magic , which can be found here (you do NOT need to purchase this for this class)
Hogwarts for Muggles: Hermione Granger's Successful Study Skills
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Hermione Granger
Meets once per week for 6 weeks.  Many learners don't have study skills developed just the way they would like. In order to succeed at Hogwarts or in the Muggle world, retention of information is a necessity. During this course, we will introduce or improve upon various skills. Each week, learners will have handouts directed by Ms. Granger to help drive home the topics we're discussing in class. Weekly, we will also pull from our knowledge of the books and movies to think about times when characters did or did not use the skills we're discussing. If your learner has not read the books or seen the movies, I have and I'll pass my knowledge along! Each week, learners will have homework, which will typically be to practice the skill we learned that week.
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Snape's Potions Class
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Snape
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 11 weeks. At Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Potions is a required subject for students, from first year to fifth year. Potion recipes can be found in many books, including the books the students at Hogwarts use in their classes, but the intricacies of timing, ageing, stirring techniques, and bottling which are much more difficult to learn without the mentoring of the experienced masters. As your experienced Potions Master, I’m here to help! During this course, I’ll use a combination of printables, videos, slideshows, and more to aid in discussion and information presentation. Homework will be assigned as needed. By the end of this course, learners will gain an understanding of how chemicals work when combined with one another, and where to find elements on the table. Once we have a solid grasp of the Periodic Table of Elements (PToE), both the Muggle and Wizard versions, we will move on to using the Scientific Method to form hypotheses before conducting experiments. No prior knowledge about the PToE is required for this course. Handouts will be provided for classes as needed. Additionally, basic lab safety gear (gloves, goggles, lab coat or something to protect clothing, etc) and glass jars (recycled is fine!) to use for experiments will be needed. Basic household ingredients will be used for these experiments.
Professor Vector's Arithmancy Class (Numbers and Logic)
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Professor Vector
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  Arithmancy is one of Hermione’s favorite subjects at Hogwarts because it is a very precise, measurable, and almost scientific method of understanding the world around her. This is a method of divination by numbers first used by the ancient Greeks. They assigned values to the letters in the names of combatants to foretell the outcome of battles. Later, in the ninth century BC, the Chaldeans in Arabia (where our modern number system also comes from) practiced a form of arithmancy that divided their alphabet into three parts, each part composed of seven letters which they attributed to the then known seven planets. Wizards still use a similar system today, all these thousands of years later. In this class, we will study the history of Arithmancy and numbers and much more. Pulling from the world of Harry Potter, I’ll introduce logic and fun into a math class that helps learners use critical thinking skills to develop and solve codes, and work puzzles. We will study patterns, and use all this information to predict future events to get all of our Arithmancers ready for the O.W.L. (Ordinary Wizarding Level exam, completed during the fifth year at Hogwarts; in this course, we will simply have a comprehensive review) exam!
Professor Lupin's Defense Against the Dark Arts
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Professor Lupin
Meets for 45 minutes once per week for 6 weeks.  What is a Dementor? “Dementors are among the foulest creatures that walk this earth. They infest the darkest, filthiest places, they glory in decay and despair, they drain peace, hope, and happiness out of the air around them… Get too near a Dementor and every good feeling, every happy memory will be sucked out of you.”–http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Dementor What is a Patronus? “As Professor Lupin tells Harry in Prisoner of Azkaban, the Patronus is ‘a kind of Anti-Dementor – a guardian which acts as a shield between you and the Dementor.’ It’s also ‘a kind of positive force, a projection of the very things that the Dementor feeds upon – hope, happiness, the desire to survive – but it cannot feel despair, as real humans can, so the Dementors can’t hurt it.’”–https://www.pottermore.com/features/what-is-a-patronus The Dark Arts, also known as Dark Magic, refers to any type of magic in the Harry Potter world (HP) that is mainly used to cause harm to or control someone. Despite being labeled “dark”, the Dark Arts are not necessarily “evil”. Sometimes, our Dark Magic is something we just need to learn a skillset to overcome. Positive self-talk can have a big impact on how we think and feel. Over time, engaging in more positive self-talk can help reduce stress, improve self-esteem, increase motivation, inspire productivity, and improve overall mental and physical health. Teachers, counselors, and parents can have a huge role in helping kids and young adults develop a greater voice for positive self-talk. In the Muggle world, our Dementors can be our negative thoughts, feelings, emotions, memories, and more. Our Patronus can be anything inside of us that gives us strength and helps to ward off our Dementors. Using HP to meet learners where they want to learn, I will work to teach them what they need to learn about being positive and using positive self-talk. A combination of slideshows, videos, printables, and oral presentation will help learners gain the skills I’ve referenced.
Professor Trelawney's Divination Class
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Professor Trelawney
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 6 weeks.  Divination is an elective course taught at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It teaches methods of divining the future, or gathering insights into future events, through various rituals and tools. The magic taught in this class, as well as the ability to say prophetic things is a branch of magic referred to as “Divination.” While most of what Trelawney teaches seems to be just “lucky guesswork and a spooky manner,” as Harry thinks, In this course, we will explore all the avenues of Divination…except Centaur Divination (unless you know where to find a Centaur!) This course is lighthearted and fun, and great elective for anyone interested in Harry Potter or fortunetelling.
Hogwarts for Muggles: The Psychology of Harry Potter
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Hogwarts for Muggles: The Psychology of Harry Potter Image
Meets for 45 minutes per week for 4 weeks.  Students will learn basic concepts across three areas of psychology including: social psychology, child development and learning. Using psychology articles, the characters and stories from the beloved J.K Rowling novels and other related reading materials, students will read and discuss concepts in resilience and adversity, resisting social influence, understanding psychological concepts of good and evil, scientific inquiry, learning styles and much more . Students should have read the Harry Potter books, or watched the movies before starting the class. There will be a weekly reading assignment along with writing reflection that the student will share in class. Reflections should be no longer than one page and can be a summary of the reading material or a reaction to the reading itself. Students can try to make comparisons between the theory introduced in the reading and the characters and themes in Harry Potter.
One-Time Classes
Fusion, Fission, and Nuclear Power: Exploring the Chernobyl Disaster
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Fusion, Fission, and Nuclear Power: Exploring the Chernobyl Disaster Image
Meets once for 70-80 minutes. Chernobyl is a town in Ukraine, however, when people remember Chernobyl, it is usually in reference to the Chernobyl nuclear accident. This nuclear accident in 1986 is considered to be the worst of its kind due to the high number of casualties and the cost. This nuclear disaster occurred on April 26th, 1986, when a power surge during a systems test at reactor four resulted in an explosion and a fire that sent radioactive fallout into the atmosphere. Massive evacuation efforts in the surrounding area ensued, with 45,000 people in nearby Pripyat being immediately evacuated. Many died from radiation exposure and the health of many more has been affected. In this class, we will: • Identify Chernobyl’s location • Introduce the history of Nuclear Energy • Help learners grasp the concepts of how Nuclear Power works using fusion and fission with examples • Present information about Nuclear Reactors and their operations • Tour a working Nuclear Power Plant • Learn the history of Chernobyl before the disaster • Watch and listen to interviews with workers at Chernobyl to learn what happened, how it affected people in 1986, and how it still affects the world today • Understand the effects the accident had on wildlife • View a video that breaks down what happened at Chernobyl • See a walking tour of Chernobyl, current day • Discuss what we’ve learned from the disaster • Talk about some of the common myths and misconceptions about Nuclear Power
Microfiction: Fiction in a Flash!
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Microfiction: Fiction in a Flash! Image
Meets once for 60 minutes. This fun creative writing class shows pre-teens and teens that an entire story can be written in just two sentences. A part of the brainstorming and writing process for many writers, a microfiction story is complete but can also be expanded. Good stories come in all shapes and sizes—all lengths and forms. If a novel can be thought of as a ten course meal, and a short story as an excellent deli-sandwich. A microfiction piece might be an exquisite chocolate truffle. All are food. All are enjoyable. But they’re each very different. Microfiction is a scrumptious, bite-sized nugget of a story. It packs big flavor and satisfaction into a small package. As a writer, microfiction forces you to really look at your prose and determine what’s essential and what isn’t; what’s redundant and what isn’t. Honing these skills on microfiction can make your short story and novel-length prose that much sharper, but it’s also an art form of its own—a different medium for expression—as different from shorts stories as short stories are from novels. It’s fun to explore different story-telling media, and some writers find that microfiction is their medium of choice. During this class, we will write four microfiction stories each of a different genre, a total of eight sentences total. This is actually much more difficult than it sounds! Learners can use this to create short stories for portfolio pieces, or even novels. I will begin with showing a short Prezi at the beginning of class, with information and examples. A dazzling alternative to Powerpoint, Prezi allows presenters to “zoom” to their next slide and the modern design captivates a pre-teen and teen audience. Learners will then write and present their stories. It's always fun to hear what people can come up with when they only have two sentences!
Minibeasts: Creepy Crawly Friends
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Minibeasts: Creepy Crawly Friends Image
Meets once for 45-60 minutes. Minibeasts are small animals that do not have an internal skeleton. In this class, we will learn about the habitats, habits, diet, and more for these minibeasts: -Butterfly -Spider -Ant -Dragonfly -Earthworm -Slug -Ladybird/Ladybug -Caterpillar -Snail -Fly -Bee -Wasp -Centipede -Beetle -Woodlouse I've prepared a Powerpoint Presentation I'll screenshare. After we discuss the slideshow, we will do our activities: butterfly life cycle cut and paste, counting, labeling an insect, a detective activity, and my favorite minibeast. I've also included a printable board game I've used in in-person classes that you can print and do at home. This is a really great introductory class for young/first time learners, or for older, more experienced ones!
NASA and the Great Space Race
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NASA and the Great Space Race Image
Meets one time for 70-90 minutes.  This short crash-course will discuss some of N.A.S.A.'s most famous accomplishments including Project Mercury, Project Gemini, Project Apollo (especially Apollo 8 and Apollo 11) the space shuttle era and its use with the Hubble Telescope and the International Space Station. The lesson also briefly discusses some famous astronauts and cosmonauts that ventured into space or onto the moon first. As the title indicates, much of the first half of the lesson focuses on the historical and epic space race between the Americans and the Soviets. I have prepared a 30+ PowerPoint Slideshow that we will go over in class together while we answer a short student packet.
Owl Pellet Dissection and Discussion-Live Lab!
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Owl Pellet Dissection and Discussion-Live Lab! Image
Meets once for 90 minutes-2 hours. A brief break will be taken.  Owls are birds of prey, and one of the things they eat are small animals. After an owl eats the small rodents, birds, and bugs that are a part of its nightly diet, its stomach cannot digest the fur, bones, teeth, feathers, and insect shells from that food. These “extra” parts are formed into a tight pellet inside the owl and are then are later spit up by the owl. Owl pellets are the undigested parts of animals. In this course, learners are given the opportunity to show the structure of a food chain based on evidence from the dissection of an owl pellet. Although they have only minimal information (based on what's in the owl pellet) they should be able to infer other components of the food chain (sources of energy, plants, decomposers, etc.) as they existed in the natural environment. Learners will also be able to predict what would happen should owls be taken out of the food chain and how this might impact the natural world as a whole. We will begin with a short slideshow that outlines the following: ecosystems, ecologists, producers/consumers, population and growth, predators, and more. We will then use the Scientific Method to make predictions before dissection. As we dissect the pellet, we will sort what we find. In our packet, we will find various bone diagrams and we will try to figure out which animals the owl had eaten. We will fill out our packet after we're finished, and do a food web drawing and writing activity. This entire process takes 90 minutes to 2 hours. Unifying Concepts: Cause and effect Form and function Interdependence Systems Life Science Concepts: Populations and ecosystems Structure and function Physical Science Concept: Transfer and transformation of energy Science in Personal and Societal Perspectives Concept: Population, resources, environments Mathematics Concepts: Data collection, organization and analysis Diagrams Measurement ELA Concepts: Organized technical writing Determining central ideas or conclusions while providing an accurate summary Comparing and contrasting information gained from discipline-specific tasks and media and from text
Board Games Online: Once Upon a Time (Storytelling)
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Board Games Online: Once Upon a Time (Storytelling) Image
This is a class based on the the tabletop card game Once Upon a Time which can be seen here: http://a.co/2Owplsb You do NOT need to purchase the game for this class; I have the game, and will present cards to each player. For this version, I will draw cards in class for each participant. Each player will be given 2 cards from each of these categories: characters, things, places, aspects, and events, plus one ending card. Players will record the cards they're given on the worksheet I've provided. I'll start off telling my story using my cards, and then learners will follow suit and tell their stories using the elements on their cards, and adding in their own details to guide the plot toward the conclusion on the Ending Card. After everyone has told their stories, we will “draw” again, and this time, we will work on cooperative storytelling so that each person's story follows another, and they go together as a collaborative work. This version does not include interrupt cards, as the focus is to aide in understanding oral storytelling. This is a really fun, low-pressure way to help struggling writers understand what is included in stories, or help learners who enjoy writing expand on their writing.
Christmas Around the World!
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Christmas Around the World! Image
Meets once for 60-90 minutes. This one-hour class will cover info on the Santa figure for each country below, as well as holiday foods, traditions, and decorations: *America *Australia *Brazil *Germany *Italy *Japan *Liberia, Africa *Mexico *Antarctica I will have a PowerPoint Presentation I'll screen share, and then I will read the slides aloud. Geared toward younger students, this class requires NO writing, NO independent reading, and is just a really fun way to learn about some of the culture dynamics of other countries.
Book Club: Booktalks for Upper Elementary and Middle School
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Book Club: Booktalks for Upper Elementary and Middle School Image
Meets for 45-60 minutes once per month. This is a drop-in club, so students will enroll each month they'd like to attend. This class has a minimum of 5 students per meeting to encourage conversation and sharing. booktalk is an informal oral recommendation about a book that you really enjoyed reading. These are usually 5-10 minutes per student, and are unscripted. Our virtual book club is not like most. While this is a drop-in club that meets once per month, there is a spin: we don't designate what book you will read! You will join your peers to learn about what they've read. Each participant chooses a book they enjoy. Here's how this works:
  • In our first meeting, I will introduce book talks by giving one myself and discussing how the process works and best practices.
  • Between classes, students will read an appropriate-leveled book (I can help find one if needed). Then, each student will record information about their book on the assigned handout.
  • During classes, each student will present their recorded information to the group. As a group, we will discuss the book and ask relevant questions.
What makes this class so different from traditional class book clubs is that in my book club, students have the opportunity to present a book they truly enjoy and want to read versus a book they're assigned as a group. The class is challenged by me to read books their classmates present if that book sounds interesting to them, but they are not required to. One of the biggest benefits of this class is that students are given the opportunity to discuss and analyze literature in a moderated setting that encourages growth mindset and sharing of new information. This is a great way to get reluctant readers interested in reading and sharing information.
Yummy Chemistry: Candy pH Testing-LIVE LAB!
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Yummy Chemistry: Candy pH Testing-LIVE LAB! Image
Meets once for 90 minutes.  In this class, students will learn the vocabulary terms: acid, base, alkaline, pH, pH scale. Students will participate in developing a working hypothesis for the outcome of this lab. We will test different types of candy for levels of acidity and alkalinity. Then, we will analyze the results of the lab and develop a conclusion based on our analysis. Is there a sweeter way to learn science?! No way!
Professional Development Workshops for Parent-Teachers
Executive Function Skills 101: Workshop for Parents
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Executive Function Skills 101: Workshop for Parents Image
Meets once for 90 minutes-2 hours Executive function is a set of mental processes that helps us connect past experience with present action. People use it to perform activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to and remembering details and managing time and space. There are specific strategies you can use to help children with executive dysfunction overcome or compensate for their difficulties. People of all ages can lack in executive skills. To better understand and support your kids when they lack certain these skills, it helps to know about the underlying brain functions that go awry to create such challenges. This course is designed to explain executive functions in a clear, understandable way and to help you pinpoint the struggles your child might experience. It’s organized into three broad categories where executive skills come into play: learning; behavior and emotions; and social situations and relationships. I’ll present each section with tips for providing support and practice in specific skill areas. Even if your children don’t struggle with executive function, you may come to appreciate their executive skills and learn how to help them shore up those that need work! I’ve also found some parents have learned this course helped bridge the gap in what they lacked in executive function skills. During this workshop, we will discuss the Executive Function skills mentioned above, do a short checklist to see where your child(ren) might need some work, and brainstorm how to help your children secure these skills. A handout with information I’ll be discussing will be provided before the workshop begins. You may want to bring note-taking paper and something to write with, and possibly a highlighter. So, come have a cup of coffee or tea and let’s learn how to best help your child succeed!
Executive Function Skills for Adults
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Executive Function Skills for Adults Image
Meets for 70-90 minutes once per week for 12 weeks These seven executive function skills are critical in managing everyday life and long-term goals:
  • Self-awareness: Simply put, this is self-directed attention
  • Inhibition: Also known as self-restraint
  • Non-Verbal Working Memory: The ability to hold things in your mind. Essentially, visual imagery — how well you can picture things mentally
  • Verbal Working Memory: Self-speech, or internal speech that people think of this as their “inner monologue”
  • Emotional Self-Regulation: The ability to take the previous four executive functions and use them to manipulate your own emotional state. This means learning to use words, images, and your own self-awareness to process and alter how we feel about things
  • Self-Motivation: How well you can motivate yourself to complete a task when there is no immediate external consequence
  • Planning and Problem Solving: Experts sometimes like to think of this as “self-play” — how we play with information in our minds to come up with new ways of doing something. By taking things apart and recombining them in different ways, we’re planning solutions to our problems.
If you’re curious if you could have Executive Functioning Weaknesses, please read my faq. You can also take the assessment here to see how much of an impact these weaknesses have.
Semester Courses
Young Scientists: Early Elementary
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Young Scientists: Early Elementary Image
Meets for 30 minutes per meeting, three times per week, for 18 weeks. In this semester-long course, we will break down the following to the most basic levels for young learners: forces, weather, machines, and engineering, properties of light and sound, plants: parts, survival, growth, structure, function, adaptations; properties & phases of matter, earth’s surface processes, flowers: life cycle, traits, & heredity; animals: habitats, heredity, changes over time; forces & motion, magnetism, weather, climate, water cycle, rock cycle, erosion, natural hazards, and more! I’ll incorporate videos, slideshows, games, books, and simple written work (sparingly) along with experiments and coloring sheets learners can complete outside of class (not required) to enhance their learning. This is a complete, comprehensive course that covers everything a young person needs to set a good foundation for a lifetime love for science. I’ll break down each class to ensure all learners understand and can explain back to me what the subject matter is to help ensure a firm grasp of the content. My lesson plan for this course has been tested and has been proven successful, engaging, comprehensive, fundamental, and most importantly–fun! I would love to have your young scientist join me as we gain a solid foundation and understanding of science! Learners do not need to know how to read, although it might be helpful for some. I’ll read all written work aloud.
Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science-Semester I
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Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science-Semester I Image
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, three times per week, for 15 weeks.  If you’re looking for an all-inclusive course for grades 5-9 science, this is it! The activities in this class get your children thinking and behaving like REAL scientists. If you’re looking to build strong science literacy, problem-solving skills and metacognition in your children, this is a great foundational class. I don’t provide lectures, but I do introduce Socratic-style discussion in order to help kids learn HOW to think, not WHAT to think. We will perform experiments, labs, write papers, and more. I’ll provide printables, videos, projects, and everything needed to have a successful semester of science; you’ll provide a few extra elements for in-person activities (around $20, and I’ll share an Amazon list with you, but you may order from anywhere). Most experiments and labs will be performed in class, time permitting, but some may be done outside of class. In class, I’ll use slides and handouts in addition to oral presentation to introduce concepts and information to learners. We will record some as we go along, and some will be recorded on printables. I’ll have virtual flashcards to use to review outside of class. Virtual labs can be completed as well. While we do have 45 classes, the first is an introduction class to the entire course. I’ll provide printables, videos, projects, and everything needed to have a successful year of science; you’ll provide a few extra elements for in-person activities (around $20, and I’ll share an Amazon list with you, but you may order from anywhere).  
Young Historians: Upper Elementary Social Studies/U.S. History
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Young Historians: Upper Elementary Social Studies/U.S. History Image
Meets twice per week, 45 minutes per meeting, for 16 weeks. 
I’ll incorporate videos, slideshows, games, books, and written work. This is a complete, comprehensive course that covers everything a young person needs to set a good foundation for a lifetime love for social studies and history. I’ll break down each class to ensure all learners understand and can explain back to me what the subject matter is to help ensure a firm grasp of the content. My lesson plan for this course has been tested and has been proven successful, engaging, comprehensive, fundamental, and most importantly–fun! I would love to have your young historian join me as we gain a solid foundation and understanding of social studies/history! Topics covered: -Indigenous Peoples -Explorers -13 Colonies -Westward Expansion -American Revolution -Inventions of the 1800’s -Abolition & Suffrage -The Civil War -Government/Civics -Economics -Wars and Battles -Study of each learner’s home state (non-US students may choose any state to study) Topics will have passages, task cards, interactive vocabulary materials, writing prompts, I Have, Who Has? games, trading cards, video and web resources, assessments, and more! Printables and handouts are available before each class. Additional resources are linked in the Canvas classroom. We will be reading selected excerpts from Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States", which I'll provide as needed. Please remember: this is not a whitewashed version of U.S. History. This is accurate and factual. You do NOT need to purchase anything additional; this is comprehensive course that covers approximately grades 4-8 social studies/history!
Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 1)
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Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 1) Image
Meets for one hour, once per week, for 10 weeks. Dungeons & Dragons is not just a role-playing game, it’s an educational RPG! Dungeons & Dragons helps the players build academic skills like reading and writing, basic mathematics, critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork. These academic skills are important to developing people at a young age. Yet, the positive aspects of Dungeons & Dragons is not only academic but the game requires a large amount of social interaction among players. Through normal game progression of the story, players are challenged by obstacles that require teamwork and coordination that is comparable to participating on a baseball, soccer, or football team. Dungeons & Dragons promotes skills that any educator strives to teach and build in developing people. As a beginner to the game, a player is tasked with getting familiarized with the basic fundamentals and how to create a character. For this portion, we will have each player create a character and then write a backstory. Once a character is created the goal of the players is to level these characters and gain new abilities and skills. Some players may choose to play a character that casts spells while others may strive to be a melee character. Whichever path, the player must decide how to build their character to meet their goals. Different characters will have different abilities, so we will choose wisely what aspects our characters will have. I will then act as Dungeonmaster and create a world for players to use. Players will come across monsters, quests, treasure, as well as towns and cities while exploring the world around them. This part of the game requires role-playing with the dungeon master and fellow players. This role-playing rouses the imagination and helps players build social skills and problem solving skills to complete tasks. For example, these tasks may involve coercing a non-player character to help the players carry out a duty, gain information or just simply solving a puzzle in the game. These problem solving and social skills are essential to developing people, especially if the players are in their early and mid-teens. I’ll use puzzles and riddles to help students with their problem solving skills. We will also use teamwork to help us through the game. Teamwork is important because each player’s character has special skills that make them ideal for certain tasks. Some characters are stealthier than others and make great spies and rogues. Other characters are strong and bulky and do well in melee to absorb damage that could otherwise destroy another player’s character. And some characters use magic to change the tide of battle in their favor. No matter what a character’s role the player quickly realizes that often they need their allies to carry out tasks that benefit the group. Not only does Dungeons & Dragons promote critical reading, writing, problem solving and social interaction but the game also requires the continual use of common mathematical skills such as addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication, and sometimes requires players to read tables of information. Based on dice rolls, players use these numerical results in battles for determining success or fail of skill checks, determining randomized items, randomized events, and for moving combat forward. Math is first used in the game when characters are being created to determine ability scores. While this is a great course for struggling or apprehensive writers, even experienced writers and learners who enjoy writing find this class to be very fun and useful! In a traditional D&D game, players can be eliminated from the game. I won’t run my campaign this way; as the DM (Dungeonmaster), I’ll have unlimited resurrections (rez’s) I can use. This way, there is no defined winner/loser, and we really focus on the skills I’ve outlined. It’s hard to develop those skills if a player has been eliminated!
Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 2)
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Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 2) Image
Meets for 90 minutes once per week for 16 weeks. If learners have not already taken Level 1, they need to have extensive experience playing live with 5th edition and homebrew games, have an understanding of races/classes, know how to fill out a blank character sheet, and understand gameplay. This class includes 16.5 TOTAL HOURS of live gameplay!*** I’ve been playing D&D for about 15 years. I have always liked my nerdy side, but especially when I can use it as a tool for education! Dungeons & Dragons is not just a role-playing game (RPG), it’s an educational RPG! Dungeons & Dragons helps the players build academic skills like reading and writing, basic mathematics, critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork. These academic skills are important to developing people at a young age. Yet, the positive aspects of Dungeons & Dragons is not only academic but the game requires a large amount of social interaction among players. Through normal game progression of the story, players are challenged by obstacles that require teamwork and coordination that is comparable to participating on a baseball, soccer, or football team. Dungeons & Dragons promotes skills that any educator strives to teach and build in developing people. Each player will create a character from scratch, and then write a backstory. Once a character is created, the goal of the players is to level these characters and gain new abilities and skills. Some players may choose to play a character that casts spells while others may strive to be a melee character. Whichever path, the player must decide how to build their character to meet their goals. Different characters will have different abilities, so we will choose wisely what aspects our characters will have. I will act as Dungeonmaster and create a world for players to use; all of my boards will be viewed via share-screen and each player will see exactly where they are in the dungeon, encampment, arena, or other areas. Players will come across monsters, quests, treasure, as well as towns and cities while exploring the world around them. This part of the game requires role-playing with the dungeon master and fellow players. This role-playing rouses the imagination and helps players build social skills and problem-solving skills to complete tasks. For example, these tasks may involve coercing a non-player character to help the players carry out a duty, gain information or just simply solving a puzzle in the game. These problem solving and social skills are essential to developing people, especially if the players are in their early and mid-teens. I’ll use puzzles and riddles to help students with their problem-solving skills. We will also use teamwork to help us through the game. Teamwork is important because each player’s character has special skills that make them ideal for certain tasks. Some characters are stealthier than others and make great spies and rogues. Other characters are strong and bulky and do well in melee to absorb damage that could otherwise destroy another player’s character. And, some characters use magic to change the tide of battle in their favor. No matter what a character’s role the player quickly realizes that often they need their allies to carry out tasks that benefit the group. Not only does Dungeons & Dragons promote critical reading, writing, problem-solving and social interaction but the game also requires the continual use of common mathematical skills such as addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication, and sometimes requires players to read tables of information. Based on dice rolls, players use these numerical results in battles for determining success or fail of skill checks, determining randomized items, randomized events, and for moving combat forward. Math is first used in the game when characters are being created to determine ability scores. While this is a great course for struggling or apprehensive writers, even experienced writers and learners who enjoy writing find this class to be very fun and useful! Homework will only be assigned if the backstory isn’t finished in class 2 or the character storyline isn’t completed in class 15.
The Hunger Games Book 1 Novel Study
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The Hunger Games Book 1 Novel Study Image
Meets once per week for 14 weeks The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins is a fantastic novel about a 16-year old girl named Katniss who volunteers to take her younger sister’s place in a government-mandated competition where only one teenager will survive. The book is Katniss’ story where we learn of her compassion for her sister, her struggles to survive, and her conflicting emotions toward her fellow competitors. We follow her as she is whisked away from her home, wondering if she will ever see her family again. The love of reading gives us opportunities to think critically about not only literature, but other media as well. Reading expands our minds and broadens our horizons. If we can use popular literature to engage our young readers, then by all means let’s do it. Maybe along the way our readers will learn to appreciate Shakespeare and Hemingway. Reading this high-interest novel motivates reluctant readers: – Learners can make connections from history to the present and have serious discussions about our future through the novel. – Learners are exposed to characters that have the same fears, insecurities, struggles, and emotions as them; though the settings and events are very different, they can relate to the characters and see how they deal with challenges. – It offers numerous opportunities in other content areas, such as: Social studies: war-related topics (such as revolutions/rebellions, strategies, the Holocaust), ancient Greek and Roman history, mythology, geography, social hierarchy, economics, politics, and propaganda. Business: advertising and marketing, branding, and business ethics. Science: ecology, weather, natural and man-made disasters, herbalism, genetic engineering/modification, and physics. Technology: modern transportation and innovations. Consumer Issues: food choices/harvesting/preparation, hunger/starvation, and the cost of living. Health: depression, dietary needs/nutrition, and malnourishment. Media: the effects of reality TV, desensitization, and persuasion. Character Education: ethics/morals, bullying, compassion for others, leadership, and values. I am excited to have the opportunity to share this riveting novel with your learners. After finishing this book, most learners are excited to read the rest of the trilogy. This course will consist of discussions, activities, and assignments that encourage critical and creative thinking. Learners will be encouraged to reflect upon the reading and discuss how to prevent this modern form of genocide from happening. Because of the violence in the novel (and movies), this class requires a certain degree of maturity. If you have questions, please message me. A .pdf copy of the book is provided, but you can purchase a hard copy if you’d prefer: The Hunger Games (Book 1) by Suzanne Collins http://a.co/5V3bfUa
Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science: Semester 2
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Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science: Semester 2 Image
Meets for one hour twice per week for 16 weeks.  This course is specifically designed for grades 5-9. Disciplines of Science covered include:
  • Earth Science
  • Ecology
  • Physics
  • Biology
  • Astronomy
The activities in this class get your children thinking and behaving like REAL scientists. If you’re looking to build strong science literacy, problem-solving skills and metacognition in your children, this is a great foundational class. I don’t provide lectures, but I do introduce Socratic-style discussion in order to help kids learn HOW to think, not WHAT to think. We will perform experiments, labs, write papers, and more. I’ll provide printables, videos, projects, and everything needed to have a successful semester of science; you’ll provide a few extra elements for in-person activities (around $20, and I’ll share an Amazon list with you, but you may order from anywhere Students will also need a microscope, and I'll recommend a few options, but the price points are between $30-$60 at the time of this posting). Most experiments and labs will be performed in class, time permitting, but some may be done outside of class. In class, I’ll use slides and handouts in addition to oral presentation to introduce concepts and information to learners. We will record some as we go along, and some will be recorded on printables. I’ll have virtual flashcards to use to review outside of class. Virtual labs can be completed as well.
Pre-Algebra: Semester I
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Pre-Algebra: Semester I Image
Meets for one hour twice per week for 20 weeks. This course has a prerequisite, which you can find here. Students to not have to have taken my course to qualify, but they must have a solid understanding of numbers to proceed, so please review the skills in the previously linked course to ensure your child is ready. If in doubt, please contact me for a placement test. This course is the equivalent of quarters 1 and 2 in a typical Pre-algebra classroom (taken between grades 7 and 9 in public schools, but there is no grade/age requirement for this class. If students are ready for the material, they're welcome in my class.) I will provide all printable material necessary, and each week will include videos, virtual flashcard decks, and more as needed. We will cover the following topics in this course:
  • Review of natural number arithmetic
  • New types of numbers such as integers, fractions, decimals and negative numbers
  • Factorization of natural numbers
  • Properties of operations such as associativity and distributivity
  • Simple (integer) roots and powers
  • Rules of evaluation of expressions, such as operator precedence and use of parentheses
  • Basics of equations, including rules for invariant manipulation of equations
  • Understanding of variable manipulation
  • Manipulation and arithmetic with the standard 4-quadrant Cartesian coordinate plane
Students will learn to think flexibly about relationships among fractions, decimals, and percents. They will also learn to recognize and generate equivalent expressions and solve single-variable equations and inequalities. We will investigate and explore mathematical ideas and develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations. As a group, we will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. I'll also expect my students to apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to their life experiences, and will provide opportunities and projects to facilitate this requirement.
Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester II
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Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester II Image
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, three days per week, for 20 weeks. 
If you’re looking for a fun, interactive, all-inclusive math course for grades 6-9 math, this is it! The activities in this class get your children thinking and behaving like REAL mathematicians and engineers. If you’re looking to build strong math literacy, fluency, problem-solving skills and metacognition in your children, this is a great foundational class. I don’t provide lectures, but I do introduce Socratic-style discussion in order to help kids learn HOW to think, not WHAT to think. Projects are assigned and discussed to ensure learners fully comprehend each topic I’ll provide printables, videos, projects, and everything needed to have a successful year of math; you’ll provide a few extra elements for in-person activities. These items depend on what your learner chooses. Most projects will be worked on in class, time permitting, but some may be done outside of class. In class, I’ll use slides and handouts in addition to oral presentation to introduce concepts and information to learners. We will record some as we go along, and some will be recorded on printables. I’ll have virtual flashcards to use to review outside of class. Virtual math labs can be completed as well. I will have printables and worksheets available for each concept.
Single-Subject Mastery Courses
Executive Functions: Beginner's Course for Little Learners
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Executive Functions: Beginner
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 12 weeks. Executive functioning skills are the basis for planning, organizing, initiating, and following through with all tasks, assignments, and problems inside and outside of school. Many students who forget assignments, are disorganized, can’t complete long-term assignments, have trouble focusing, and experience difficulty with change often have weak executive functioning skills. These are the students who need to be taught explicit skills in order to become successful in school and in life after school. Simply put, executive functioning skills are necessary life skills. It’s important to note that all kids, no matter the age, can learn improved executive functioning skills. These lessons are specifically designed with pictures, drawing, and simple wording to allow younger learners to access executive functioning materials. Each week, we will meet live and discuss the week’s skill. Then, we will have time to work on these skills in class, and learners will be assigned “homework” that coincides with the skill we’ve learned. For example, when studying planning, learners may be assigned work that includes planning a pretend sleepover with a friend, or a tea party with their favorite toys. Assignments can vary based on learner interests and maturity levels, but all have the same goal: help each child learn to use this skill effectively and efficiently. Printables are provided for each skill’s work. Learners are also provided with a certificate of completion.
Executive Functions, Study Skills, and Goal Setting for Pre-Teens and Teens
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Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 15 weeks. The executive functions are a set of processes that all have to do with managing oneself and one’s resources in order to achieve a goal. It is an umbrella term for the neurologically-based skills involving mental control and self-regulation. In this course, we will cover executive functions, followed by a unit on study skills. The study skills unit is a great foundation for learners who may or may not be struggling; these are absolutely necessary skills for success in any part of life. Each lesson is divided into five parts: introduction, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and reflection. In each class, you can expect us to discuss the skill (introduction), information about using these skills outside of education (modeling), and activities to practice the skill (independent practice). Each skill also has printable handouts we will discuss during class. These are completed as homework and uploaded to our classroom. Additionally, learners are required to formulate responses to discussion board posts (guided practice). Learners will be expected to practice the skills we learn outside of class and report back to the class about how these worked out (reflection). Learners will be expected to also have a homework log for our first class, and a planner/calendar for each one thereafter. I have complimentary printables available in my Canvas classroom and can help find some that work for you. ***I do have extensive experience working with neurodivergent learners, and around 90% of my learners have had at least one diagnosis (ADD, ADHD, ODD, PTSD, TBI, OCD, Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, and many others) that interferes with their EFS. The course materials can be differentiated when needed. If you have questions about this, please contact me.  
Poetry 101: Elements-A Complete Unit
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Poetry 101: Elements-A Complete Unit Image
Meets for 45 minutes once per week for 10 weeks. I’ve prepared a PowerPoint presentation that provides in-depth analysis of each of aspect of poetry. We will use this for each of the first 4 classes. Each of these classes will be followed up by a short handout completed and discussed during class. We will also write poems together. We will study the career, personal life, and legacies of poets Dickinson, Hughes, Frost, and Poe. For our research presentation, each student will choose a different poet to study and his/her poem dissect using what we’ve learned in class.
Executive Function Skills: At Your Own Pace
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Executive Function Skills: At Your Own Pace Image
The executive functions are a set of processes that all have to do with managing oneself and one’s resources in order to achieve a goal. It is an umbrella term for the neurologically-based skills involving mental control and self-regulation. In this course, we will cover executive functions, followed by a unit on study skills. The study skills unit is a great foundation for learners who may or may not be struggling; these are absolutely necessary skills for success in any part of life.
Each lesson is divided into five parts: introduction, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and reflection. In each module, you can expect learners to discuss the skill (introduction), information about using these skills outside of education (modeling), and activities to practice the skill (independent practice). Each skill also has printable handouts to aid in comprehension. These are completed as homework and uploaded to our classroom. Learners are required to formulate responses to discussion board posts (guided practice)–this is how discussions take place. Learners will be expected to practice the skills we learn outside of class and report back to the class via the discussion board posts about how these worked out (reflection). Video check-ins from me are provided, and up to three 20-minute live meetings can be scheduled if needed. I check frequently in on our classroom and respond ASAP to posts. Designed for learners who need extra time to work at their own pace, this course is done AYOP (at your own pace)/flexible schedule. Learners will work through the modules as they are able. You have up to 90 days to finish the entire course , but you’ll have access to downloaded material for life. Learners typically complete 1-2 modules per week; each module includes handouts, discussion board posts, and any other relevant material.
Learner's Lenses: Photography Club FULL COURSE
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Learner
Meets twice per week, 30 minutes per meeting, for 14 weeks I began shooting about 16 years ago, and have always had a deep love of and comfort for being behind the lens. I’ve been a studio and traveling photographer, and most recently, family/lifestyle portraiture has been my specialty. I didn’t have a Photography Club as a child or teen, and this clubs are something many homeschooling families don’t have access to. So, I decided to use my love of photography to create this course. Members of the Photography Club have a unique and creative eye, capturing images around them. Learners submit their varied images of landscapes, people, and abstracts to share with the class. Some topics are driven by a specific theme or period of time. The shared interest is a love for documenting our amazing world through photography; members always surprise each other with the way they view the world since no one ever takes the same picture. They also hone their craft by exploring topics like framing the photos, cropping, editing, creativity, well-known photographers and so much more. Our goals are to encourage positive reaction to constructive criticism, enhance knowledge of photography and art, engage learners using different themes that appeal to them, elevate their art through exploration and practice, and to help learners truly learn to enjoy photography and all its facets. We will follow this schedule for club assignments and coursework. During classes after our first class, we will have each member present his or her compositions to the class, and as a group, we will give constructive criticism (positive encouragement). We will then discuss our class topic. Homework will be to shoot 5 photos that represent, to the learner, the word assigned. Additionally, learners will shoot 5 different photos to represent the alphabet letter for the class. This is a total of ten photos as homework for each class. All ten final photos should be uploaded to our private Flickr group, and then each learner will choose their best or favorite work for each theme to present to the class, one for the word theme, and one for the alphabet theme. To submit your photos, you’ll create a free Flickr account and join our private group. Until you’ve been added to the group, you won’t be able to see anything, so don’t worry if the link is broken for you right now. Because the group is private, learner’s photos won’t show up on the regular Flickr feed, so you retain rights to your photos. For each composition assignment, learners are to comment on at least 3 photos from different classmates with constructive criticism (we discuss the compliment sandwich) in the group. At the end of the course, I will create a slideshow for each learner that features their favorite captured images for them to keep. Anticipated Course Outline: Class 1: Discussing a Growth Mindset and how this contributes to success (accepting critique and using it in a positive way). Composition: Wild; A Class 2: Composition Presentation; Discussing Depth of Field Composition: Light; B Class 3: Composition Presentation; Aperture Composition: Movement; C Class 4: Composition Presentation; Shadows Composition: Still; D Class 5: Composition Presentation; Rule of Thirds Composition: Electric; E Class 6: Composition Presentation; Leading Lines Composition: Edible; F Class 7: Composition Presentation; Negative Space Composition: Emotion; G Class 8: Composition Presentation; Catchlights Composition: Raw; H Class 9: Composition Presentation; Using Flash Composition: Color; I Class 10: Composition Presentation; Sequencing Composition: Monochrome; J Class 11: Composition Presentation; Indoor Photography Composition: Energy; K Class 12: Composition Presentation; Point of View Composition: Subtle; L Class 13: Composition Presentation; Outdoor Photography Composition: Security; M Class 14: Composition Presentation; Perspective Composition: Generations; N Class 15: Composition Presentation; Exposure Composition: Dull; O Class 16: Composition Presentation; Composition Composition: Fluid; P Class 17: Composition Presentation; Annie Leibovitz Composition: Remember; Q Class 18: Composition Presentation; Jimmy Nelson Composition: Forget; R Class 19: Composition Presentation; Rehahn Composition: Modern; S Class 20: Composition Presentation; Steve McCurry Composition: Season; T Class 21: Composition Presentation; Jeremy Cowart Composition: Alive; U Class 22: Composition Presentation; Andrea Gjestvang Composition: Rough; V Class 23: Composition Presentation; Ansel Adams Composition: Delicate; W Class 24: Composition Presentation; Dorthea Lange Composition: Fall; X Class 25: Composition Presentation; Photojournalism Composition: Rise; Y Class 26: Composition Presentation; Open Forum Composition: Choice; Z; homework for this class will be evaluated via the classroom by the teacher only. Class 27: Photo Essay Class 28: Open Forum Required equipment and skill: Learners need a camera. This can be a dSLR, but does not have to be. A cell phone, point and shoot, tablet or other camera is sufficient. Learners will need to access photo editing software. There are free online sites for this and I can link them if needed. You don’t need to purchase software or a camera for this course as long as learners have something that takes photos. Learners do not need a particular skill level to be in this class; a desire to capture the world around them in photos and a love for photography is all that’s necessary to be successful in this course. All skill levels and equipment are welcome. Three options are available. Should you choose the half or 2 week option, you can always re-enroll and finish the course.
Session Dates and Times: Mon May 21, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu May 24, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu May 31, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 4, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 7, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 11, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 14, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 18, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 21, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 25, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 2, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 9, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 16, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jul 19, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jul 26, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 2, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 6, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 9, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 13, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 16, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 27, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 30, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 6, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 10, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 13, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 17, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 20, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 24, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern
Intro to Anthropology: Socratic-Style Course
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Intro to Anthropology: Socratic-Style Course Image
Meets for 45 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  Anthropology is the study of what makes us human. Anthropologists take a broad approach to understanding the many different aspects of the human experience, which we call holism. They consider the past, through archaeology, to see how human groups lived hundreds or thousands of years ago and what was important to them. I will use a combination of carefully curated videos, handouts, and slideshows to introduce information to my students. This is NOT a lecture: participation is expected. This course requires critical thinking, and students will be expected to ask questions and fully engage in the material. We will also have Webquests and various tools to encourage and enhance both engagement and retention of information. In this course, students will learn about evolution and its mechanisms, and how it applies to the origins of modern humans. Students need only a basic awareness of theory of evolution to get started. We'll discuss how natural selection works in nature, then apply it to modern humans and our earliest ancestors. By the end of the course, students will understand evolution and the theories surrounding how it takes place, and be able to explain it with practical examples using Homo sapiens (modern human beings) and their direct and indirect ancestors.
Hogwarts for Muggles: Harry Potter Cooking Club
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Harry Potter Cooking Club Image
Meets for 45-60 minutes once per week for 8 weeks. Each school year at Hogwarts begins with a celebratory meal in its cavernous Great Hall. No doubt those magnificent meals left an indelible impression on a young Harry, who hungered for more when living with his Muggle relatives: a feeling of kinship and of family that he clearly lacked; a desire to know his clouded past, which had been carefully and deliberately hidden from him at all costs by his duplicitous uncle and aunt, the detestable Dursleys; and most of all, a desire to realize who he truly is, living in two diametrically opposed worlds, the unimaginative Muggle world and the enchanting world of wizards, his true home. In this class, we will recreate some fantastic recipes from the movies and books. Custom recipes will be shared, and we will immerse ourselves in the Wizarding World of culinary delight!
Executive Functions 101: Workshop for Students
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Executive Functions 101: Workshop for Students Image
Meets once for 75-90 minutes.  If you or your child are concerned that your child may have Executive Function weaknesses or deficits, please join me for this short workshop. We will discuss the EF skills (planning, organization, time management, task initiation, working memory, metacognition, self-control, sustained attention, flexibility, and perseverance), and ways you can improve and strengthen these skills. We will also touch on study skills and goal setting. ***I do have extensive experience working with neurodivergent learners, and around 90% of my learners have had at least one diagnosis (ADD, ADHD, ODD, PTSD, TBI, OCD, Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, and many others) that interferes with their EFS. The course materials can be differentiated when needed. If you have questions about this, please contact me using the information on my site.
The Riveting Renaissance: Socratic Method Course
99
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The Riveting Renaissance: Socratic Method Course Image
Meets for one hour once per week for 12 weeks. The Socratic Method is at the heart of critical thinking, and is a powerful tool to inspire students to take a deep interest in their own enthusiastically willful education and thriving in life. This helps students become more attentive and thoughtful as a matter of their natural character. Simply put, I will present specific information and ask certain questions that encourage your child to probe deeper and learn more. My classes are not lectures and are highly discussion-driven. The act of asking questions and seeking answers is fundamental to all human creativity and willful living. Experiences of inquiry fill our days no matter what job we have, where we live, or whether or not we have ever heard of the Socratic method. Inquiry richly colors the fabric of how our minds work. Inquiry is the workhorse of the sapience. The Socratic method directly addresses the need of students to exercise their experience and love of asking and answering questions. In the context of daily learning, the Socratic method is a productive way to stoke the fertile fire that is human curiosity. You can read more about this here: http://www.philosopher.org/Socratic_Method.html Knowledge of the Middle Ages (such as my Middle Ages course!) is helpful. This is a structured, organized, and tested course that will include written and media components and is designed to give learners a comprehensive understanding of the history of these events. As we go through the course, there are study guides provided for each portion that require answers to questions to ensure comprehension. This comprehensive course covers the complete Italian Renaissance from the beginning to Elizabethan England. Each class will have both a written and oral component, and I'll share videos and Powerpoint presentations via screenshare in zoom to aid in learning. Each class will also have opinion-based activities, like "creating" a page from Da Vinci's notebook after viewing his Codex. Some classes will have homework. Classes will each be 40-50 minutes in length.
Debate Club: Teaching Critical Thinking, Logic, and Tolerance
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Debate Club: Teaching Critical Thinking, Logic, and Tolerance Image
Meets for one hour, once per week, for 12 weeks. The format for this course is inspired by the International Debate Education Association, which focuses on education, not competition, as the goal of debates. I emphasize the development of critical thinking skills and a tolerance for differing viewpoints, instilling an appreciation for the value of teamwork. Distilling the research is an important part of the course, as is learning to debate both sides of any topic, actively listening to the arguments of opposing teams, and realizing that there is more than one way of thinking about any single question. You can read more about the benefits of debate here. This is a course designed for beginners that teaches learners to: •Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. •Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact when possible given the location of the class, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. •In this unit students will not only be required to debate with a team, they will also be required to analyze their classmates’ arguments. •Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. •Do research, take notes in an organized fashion, use logic, and more I’ll use a combination of slideshow presentations, videos, written articles, and websites to aid in this. I’ll provide handouts that we’ll use to write down our ideas and information. I’ve been teaching for debate for almost a decade. In school, I loved debate and very much enjoyed the experience of “an argument with rules”. I’ve successfully coached many learners ages 8-78 on how to debate and succeed, including Toastmasters (one of the resources we will use in this course has Toastmasters included!) I teach tolerance for others and much, much more! This class isn’t just debate; this course immerses learners in a world where they learn to research and share their point of view while respecting others and taking them into account, which creates a more even-keeled person in general, both as an adult, and a preteen/teen.
Replacing Reluctance with Optimism: Working with a Growth Mindset
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Replacing Reluctance with Optimism: Working with a Growth Mindset Image
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 4 weeks. Children can develop a growth mindset at an early age, and it is our job as educators to promote a growth mindset as much as possible. If we miss the opportunity, they may not adopt this valuable characteristic. Growth mindset is the exact opposite of a fixed mindset. If a child has a fixed mindset, they believe they cannot change their character, creativity, or potential for success. A person with a fixed mindset believes that his or her intelligence is static, while a person with a growth mindset believes that his or her intelligence can be developed. The latter group is thus more likely to embrace challenges, persist in the face of setbacks, and see effort as a natural path to mastery. The distinction between these two extremes has tremendous implications for motivation, productivity, and confidence; in the pursuit of success, mindset is everything. A growth mindset has a more positive outlook, as a child believes he/she has control over their successes and failures. If a child possesses a growth mindset, they can look at classroom tasks with a “go-getter” attitude and are able to bounce back from challenges with an optimistic point of view. When they fail at something they understand that they can use that experience to learn new ways to achieve growth towards a goal. During each class, we will celebrate success, minimize failures, celebrate the successes of others, and work to view failure as a learning opportunity. We will use the words “persistent, confident, capable” often. This class is specifically designed for students who feel down and sometimes even hopeless or incapable when faced with challenges. A growth mindset is truly necessary for success, and I would really, really love to share what I’ve done with and modeled to my family and students because I know this works, and I know this creates confident students!
Psychology: Nature, Nurture, and Human Diversity
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Meets for one hour, once per week, for six weeks. Maybe you got your green eyes from your mother, and your freckles from your father. But where did you get your thrill-seeking personality and talent for singing? Did you learn these from your parents or was it predetermined by your genes? While it’s clear that physical characteristics are hereditary, the genetic waters get a bit more murky when it comes to an individual’s behavior, intelligence, and personality. Ultimately, we do not yet know how much of what we are is determined by our DNA and how much by our life experience. But, we do know that both play a part. It has been reported that the use of the terms “nature” and “nurture” as a convenient catch-phrase for the roles of heredity and environment in human development can be traced back to 13th century France. Some scientists think that people behave as they do according to genetic predispositions or even “animal instincts.” This is known as the “nature” theory of human behavior. Other scientists believe that people think and behave in certain ways because they are taught to do so. This is known as the “nurture” theory of human behavior. Fast-growing understanding of the human genome has recently made it clear that both sides are partly right. Nature endows us with inborn abilities and traits; nurture takes these genetic tendencies and molds them as we learn and mature. End of story, right? Nope. The “nature vs nurture” debate still rages on, as scientist fight over how much of who we are is shaped by genes and how much by the environment. During this course, learners will gain a basic understanding of Psychology, and the Nature vs. Nurture debate. Using slides, slotted notes, videos, websites, interviews with psychologists, and more, I’ll facilitate learning this incredibly interesting subject.
Psychology 101: Introduction to Psychology
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Meets for one hour once per week for 4 weeks, ages 12-18 The American Psychological Association defines Psychology as “the study of the mind and behavior. The discipline embraces all aspects of the human experience—from the functions of the brain to the actions of nations, from child development to care for the aged. . . In every conceivable setting . . . ‘the understanding of behavior’ is the enterprise of psychologists.” This course is a general introduction of Psychology, relevant with instruction that integrates thinking skills, historical processes, and content so that learners are able to apply their learning to their own lives. Instruction includes the integration of concepts and principles from history, economics, geography, civics, and the humanities. I’ll use a combination of textbook excerpts, handouts, videos, information presented on screen as well as read aloud, and various review methods to ensure learners have the ability to learn what Psychology truly is, and what it’s not. This course requires critical thinking and is presented in the Socratic method of teaching to encourage this; this is not a lecture-based course. Critical thinking is the process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information to reach an answer or conclusion, and disciplined thinking that is clear, rational, open-minded, and informed by evidence. Socratic teaching focuses on giving learners questions, not answers. I model an inquiring, probing mind by continually going deeper into the subject with questions. The combination of these means learners are expected to converse regularly, both in the live meetings and the discussion board, with peers and the instructor. A great primer to my Psychology 102 course, this introduction class is a fantastic way to explore Psychology to see if your learner is interested in exploring more! My love for psychology began my junior year when I took the AP course. What was supposed to be a schedule-filling elective credit accidentally grew into a genuine fascination, and then complete immersion. I found myself going above and beyond the curriculum purely out of curiosity. My interest in what we were discussing in class every day would often send me down long, thought-provoking paths that motivated me to hunt down explanations to the answers of questions I didn’t know I had. But once I had the answers, they seemed to be demanding further explanation, and I was always more than happy to oblige. I enjoy sharing what I’ve learned with my students, and as I continue pursuing my degree in Psychology, I will continue sharing my courses with you!
The Salem Witch Trials: Socratic Method/Active Learning Course for Tweens/Teens
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The Salem Witch Trials: Socratic Method/Active Learning Course for Tweens/Teens Image
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 4 weeks. This course is not a lecture, and depends heavily on discussion! I'll introduce the Socratic method to learners in the first class. Then, I'll use slideshows, photos, videos, and slotted notes to help learners understand what the Salem Witch Trials were. We will tour the Salem Witch Museum, watch a documentary, and play a review game. In our final class, we will have a Reader's Theater-style mock trial where learners act as as townsfolk to determine where lies the fate of the accused, and why. Students will have assigned homework (videos, virtual flashcards, and other fun activities) to reinforce what we learn in class. This particular course has been tailored to 10-15 year olds, but very mature younger learners may do well. Please contact me before enrolling if your child is younger than 10.
Adulting: Meal Planning 101
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Meets for 30 minutes twice per week for 5 weeks. When it comes to eating well, meal planning is one of the easiest things you can do to set yourself up for success. The key is just to start, and to set aside a little bit of time each week to do it. There are so many ways to approach meal planning that, after practicing just once or twice, you’ll begin to find what works for you. Our eating situations can vary greatly from week to week depending on work schedules, after school activities, evening commitments, travel plans–the list goes on. During this class, we will: -set goals -set a budget -inventory pantry and other food-holding areas in the home -learn how to review grocery store circulars -learn how to plan meals based around what’s on hand (pantry/freezer/refrigerator sheet) and sales After each week, we will review the week prior and make adjustments as needed. Outside of class, students will need to go over their meal plans with their parents. Students and parents may complete the meal plan and grocery list together. Inventory sheets, a sample menu, a calendar, a blank grocery list, and a sample printable blank monthly meal plan are provided by the teacher. Your learner will need to provide paper and a pencil, grocery store circulars from the stores which you most frequently shop (can be accessed online as well as in store), and a calculator.
Stink and the Midnight Zombie Walk: Novel Study, Creative Writing, and Slime!
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Stink and the Midnight Zombie Walk: Novel Study, Creative Writing, and Slime! Image
Is your child ready for their first novel study? While this class is NOT limited to just first-timers, only the living may attend-no undead allowed! Come learn about Stink, the little brother of Judy Moody, and do some fun, non-scary Zombie-themed activities, like making SLIME! Meets once per week for six weeks, ages 5-13. Guts! Brains! Eyeballs! There’s only one week before the new book in the Nightmare on Zombie Street series comes out. Of corpse Stink will be first in line at the Blue Frog Bookstore to buy his copy and join the town’s Midnight Zombie Walk! Until then, Stink and his friends keep busy making ketchup-stained zombie costumes, trying to raise money to buy the book, and racking up points for Virginia Dare School’s race to one million minutes of reading. But with all that talk about the undead, Zink – that is, Stink – starts to wonder: is he being hunted by zombies? He does have a very delicious – er, superb – brain, after all. Readers will just have to open ze book and zee! Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Each chapter will have two specific comprehension questions, and includes a checklist at the bottom of the page reminding learners to restate the question and include details from the text to support the answer. This helps with writing in general, and is a great tool to solidify future writing assignments. Learners will do this portion outside of class. In class, while discussing what learners read, we will also analyze the plot and study the characters very carefully to identify specific traits and more. Outside of class…well, that’s where it gets really messy! Homework will be to read two chapters per class, but also do awesome things like make zombie brain slime, learn how to draw a zombie, complete coloring pages, play age-appropriate virtual zombie-themed games online, make zombie-themed foods, play games like Zombie Brain Toss, Don’t Say Zombie, Zombie Tag, and more (note: activities outside of class time are at parental discretion and are NOT required for the course)! Materials for classes will be discussed before each class so parents have enough time to gather materials; total cost of all materials including the book should be no more than $20. This is a flipped classroom model, which means learners will read the book outside of class, and then we will discuss what they’ve read during class. Anticipated Course Outline: Class 1: Introduction to the book; creative writing assignment; homework: Read Chapters 1 and 2: Vomitocius; The Smellatorium Class 2: Discussion over reading; making a comic strip; homework: Read Chapters 3 and 4: What about B.O.B.?; Curse of the Zombie Baloney Class 3: Discussion over reading; zombie-themed Mad Libs; homework: Read Chapters 5 and 6: Zombie Lunch Lady; Nightmare on Croaker Street Class 4: Discussion over reading; surprise activity; homework: Read Chapters 7 and 8: Cruella De Zombie; The (Ten O’Clock) Midnight Zombie Walk Class 5: Discussion over reading; Franken-Selfies writing and drawing. As an studious reader of The Walking Dead comics for many years, I naturally progressed into many other worlds of the undead. One thing I really enjoy about this strange hobby is that it allows me to connect with even the most reluctant readers. This topic is presented in a fun, lighthearted, non-scary manner in this class, so that younger learners or more sensitive ones feel comfortable. Because I have a strong background in literature as a published author, avid reader, and literature teacher for more than a decade, I’m able to present novel studies in a fun, engaging way so children can connect with the story, each other, and me. Printables are provided. You’ll need a copy of the book, which is $4.99 on Amazon.
Session Dates and Times: Thu May 31, 1pm – 1:40pm Eastern Thu Jun 7, 1pm – 1:40pm Eastern Thu Jun 14, 1pm – 1:40pm Eastern Thu Jun 21, 1pm – 1:40pm Eastern Thu Jun 28, 1pm – 1:40pm Eastern Thu Jul 5, 1pm – 1:40pm Eastern
Spy School is in Session: Liar and Spy Novel Study and More!
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Spy School is in Session: Liar and Spy Novel Study and More! Image
Meets twice per week, 40 minutes per meeting, for 4 weeks. 
Georges (the s is silent) was just a normal 7th grader at a normal middle school in the normal suburb of Brooklyn. But, when he and his parents move into their new apartment, Georges meets a rather abnormal boy, Safer, when he unwillingly joins his spy club. Together, the two boys investigate the mysterious Mr. X and slowly Georges begins to discover that not everything in the world of espionage is what it seems. This is such a fun, engaging way to explore reading. I love the twist of exploring the world of spies as well! Printables will allow learners to summarize each chapter which helps with comprehension, predict what will happen next, track unfamiliar vocabulary and use context clues to help decipher anything difficult to understand; we will also do character studies, make inferences, reflect on reading, find the main idea, study character growth, follow the plot, learn about cause/effect, choose our favorite quotes, become book critics, and so much more! Each class will include super fun, out-of-class activities like creating a comic strip online to recreate a scene from the book, write poetry, make secret slime, try out spy ink, watch age-appropriate videos on spies and espionage, etc. Materials for classes will be discussed before each class so parents have enough time to gather materials; total cost of all materials including the book should be no more than $20. This is a flipped classroom model, which means learners will read the book outside of class, and then we will discuss what they’ve read during class.
Daring Dragons: The Storm Dragon Novel Study and More
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Daring Dragons: The Storm Dragon Novel Study and More Image
Novel studies can be dry and boring, or fun & engaging! Join me for the latter as we explore the world of storm dragons while learning about character traits, context clues, plus vocabulary & comprehension questions–complete with a dragon craft, making slime, and more!
Meets twice per week, 35 minutes per meeting, for 4 weeks. 
“When Sophy finds a little lost dragon named Cloudy, she knows he’s in danger. It will take all the courage she can muster—and a little bit of magic—to keep the baby dragon safe. But what if there are other creatures in danger? It looks like Sophy’s going to need some friends to help her with her secret rescues…” In this course, we will explore fantasy writing and using our imaginations in a fun way. In our first class, we will discuss unicorn folklore and what we like about unicorns. Beginning in class 2 and ending in class 6, we will read aloud, round-robin style, the book The Storm Dragon. While reading, we will learn about context clues and put them in practice to predict what will happen next, and discuss character traits to help learners connect with the book. Each of these classes will be accompanied by a printable with a short set of comprehension questions, vocabulary when appropriate, and an open-ended journal prompt. These will be completed during class, time permitting; otherwise, they will be assigned as homework (each class is 30-40 minutes in length). Two classes will have fun homework that is best completed outside of class: slime and coloring/painting a dragon! There are also super fun extension activities, like learning to draw a dragon, StoryboardThat.com comic strips, and each learner’s name written in Dragon (kids LOVE this!) Whether your learner is an independent reader, a struggling or new reader, new to novel studies or a seasoned vet, this class is a unique way to help kids learn to love reading. Class 1: Dragon folklore; Homework: make Dragon slime Class 2: Chapters 1-2 Class 3: Chapters 3-4 Class 4: Chapters 5-6 Class 5: Chapters 7-8 Class 6: Chapter 9 Class 7: Book review; discussion of themes and character traits; Homework: color a dragon Class 8: Word search; “If I were a dragon” short writing and drawing assignment I have an infatuation with unicorns, dragons, and anything magical and mystical. I have an almost 10 year old daughter who has taken on this love for this amazing creatures as well. Because I have a background in fantasy writing and gaming (both tabletop and video games), I can help create an immersive world that really helps children and preteens/teens learn about how to truly read and comprehend a novel. My extension activities are always a hit as well! I will be screensharing my Kindle copy of The Storm Dragon (The Secret Rescuers Book 1) by Paula Harrison you can read more about this book here. You do NOT need to purchase a copy of the book.
Meeting Dates and Times: Mon Jul 23, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern Fri Jul 27, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern Mon Jul 30, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern Fri Aug 3, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern Mon Aug 6, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern Fri Aug 10, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern Mon Aug 13, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern Fri Aug 17, 2:30pm – 3:05pm Eastern
Unicorns Galore! The Sky Novel Study and More
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Unicorns Galore! The Sky Novel Study and More Image
Novel studies can be dry and boring, or fun & engaging! Join me for the latter as we explore the world of unicorns while learning about character traits, context clues, plus vocabulary & comprehension questions–complete with a unicorn craft, making slime, and more! Meets for 30 minutes, twice per week (1 hour per week total) for 4 weeks “Ava is horrified when Clover, a baby unicorn, is stolen from his herd by the evil Sir Fitzroy. She comes up with a secret plan to rescue him, and, wearing a clever disguise, Ava bravely sets off into the night. But will she be able to teach Clover to fly in time to escape?” In this class, we will explore fantasy writing and using our imaginations in a fun way. In our first class, we will discuss unicorn folklore and what we like about unicorns. Beginning in class 2 and ending in class 6, we will read aloud, round-robin style, the book The Sky Unicorn. While reading, we will learn about context clues and put them in practice to predict what will happen next, and discuss character traits to help learners connect with the book. Each of these classes will be accompanied by a printable with a short set of comprehension questions, vocabulary, and an open-ended journal prompt. These will be completed during class, time permitting; otherwise, they will be assigned as homework. Two classes will have fun homework that is best completed outside of class: slime and coloring/painting a unicorn! Whether your learner is an independent reader, a struggling or new reader, new to novel studies or a seasoned vet, this class is a unique way to help kids learn to love reading. Class 1: Unicorn folklore; Homework: make Unicorn slime (see how we did it here!) Class 2: Chapters 1-2 Class 3: Chapters 3-4 Class 4: Chapters 5-6 Class 5: Chapters 7-8 Class 6: Chapters 9-10 Class 7: Book review; discussion of themes and character traits; Homework: color a unicorn Class 8: Word search; “If I were a unicorn” short writing and drawing assignment I will be screensharing my Kindle copy of The Sky Unicorn (The Secret Rescuers Book 2) by Paula Harrison (you can read more about this book here: http://a.co/5wG2Nqj) You do NOT need to purchase a copy of the book.
Meeting dates and times: Mon Jun 4, 11am – 11:30am Eastern Fri Jun 8, 11am – 11:30am Eastern Mon Jun 11, 11am – 11:30am Eastern Fri Jun 15, 11am – 11:30am Eastern Mon Jun 18, 11am – 11:30am Eastern Fri Jun 22, 11am – 11:30am Eastern Mon Jun 25, 11am – 11:30am Eastern Fri Jun 29, 11am – 11:30am Eastern
Don't Let The Undead Get Ahead: Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse (or Other Disaster)
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While a zombie apocalypse might seem unlikely, you never know when necessary survival skills will come in handy, so let’s learn some just in case! Meets for 30-40 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  In this unit study, we will learn about the following: • What is a zombie? • Parts and functions of the brain • Possible cause of the zombie plague: viruses and virology • Cellular biology (extra credit homework project!) • Determining what caused a disease in a scenario, by investigating through interviews •Infectious diseases and epidemiology • Wants vs. needs • How to create an emergency plan (learners will create one with their families), and pack an emergency kit • First aid (and learners will become certified, included in this course!) • Reading a Map • Building a fire (five methods for starting a fire will be discussed; disclaimer included in the work!) • Choosing shelter • Foraging for food, plant identification, growing food, and preserving food • Defense against zombies While this unit study does cover some information about zombies, this is a really fun way to present basic survival skills as well as the science behind diseases and cures to young people. Learners and their families will also create an emergency preparedness plan, which is helpful in any disaster, not just a zombie outbreak! An online first-aid course is part of the unit study, and learners will have the opportunity to become certified; this particular class will end early so learners can complete most of this course during class time without distractions. Access to a CPR course is included as well. Learners will also discover some ways to build fires; please be advised that we discuss, many times, not putting these skills to the test without the permission and/or oversight of an adult. Because there are many different options for eradicating zombies and different students may have various comfort levels with any of the options, our Defense Against Zombies section will be student-based; each student will choose for themselves, so the exposure to anything gruesome will be limited to the child’s comfort level. Each student will write what they think is the most effective method of eradication. Your learner must be an independent reader/writer for this class, or you must sit with them. Learners will need read outside of class time for some topics. Silent reading or reading along may be required during class. At the end of this unit study, we will also play a table-top style role playing game I’ve created to test what students learned! Learners will create their character using a standard six-sided die, and then put their survival skills to the test! This last class will be longer, close to an hour, depending on the number of learners enrolled. Do YOU think you’ve got what it takes to get ahead of the undead?! A 43-page packet I’ve created for this class is included and can be printed front and back. A pencil is required for all activities, and colored pencils/crayons are helpful. Scissors and glue or a glue stick is required for some activities. A standard six-sided die and blank paper will be required for the last class.
Meeting dates and times: (NOTE: This session meets twice per week for seven weeks, instead of once per week for 12 weeks, with the exception of Tue, Jun 5.) Mon Jun 4, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Mon Jun 11, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Tue Jun 12, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Mon Jun 18, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Tue Jun 19, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Mon Jun 25, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Tue Jun 26, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Mon Jul 2, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Tue Jul 10, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Mon Jul 16, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Tue Jul 17, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern Mon Jul 23, 1:45pm – 2:15pm Eastern
Learner's Lenses: Photography Club 2-WEEK COURSE
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***Choose TWO WEEKS of this full course.*** Photography is visual communication, and young people have a lot to say. In this course, I’ll gently guide them as they say it, and show them the possibilities and provide creative motivation! Meets twice per week, 30 minutes per meeting, for 14 weeks I began shooting about 16 years ago, and have always had a deep love of and comfort for being behind the lens. I’ve been a studio and traveling photographer, and most recently, family/lifestyle portraiture has been my specialty. I didn’t have a Photography Club as a child or teen, and this clubs are something many homeschooling families don’t have access to. So, I decided to use my love of photography to create this course. Members of the Photography Club have a unique and creative eye, capturing images around them. Learners submit their varied images of landscapes, people, and abstracts to share with the class. Some topics are driven by a specific theme or period of time. The shared interest is a love for documenting our amazing world through photography; members always surprise each other with the way they view the world since no one ever takes the same picture. They also hone their craft by exploring topics like framing the photos, cropping, editing, creativity, well-known photographers and so much more. Our goals are to encourage positive reaction to constructive criticism, enhance knowledge of photography and art, engage learners using different themes that appeal to them, elevate their art through exploration and practice, and to help learners truly learn to enjoy photography and all its facets. We will follow this schedule for club assignments and coursework. During classes after our first class, we will have each member present his or her compositions to the class, and as a group, we will give constructive criticism (positive encouragement). We will then discuss our class topic. Homework will be to shoot 5 photos that represent, to the learner, the word assigned. Additionally, learners will shoot 5 different photos to represent the alphabet letter for the class. This is a total of ten photos as homework for each class. All ten final photos should be uploaded to our private Flickr group, and then each learner will choose their best or favorite work for each theme to present to the class, one for the word theme, and one for the alphabet theme. To submit your photos, you’ll create a free Flickr account and join our private group. Until you’ve been added to the group, you won’t be able to see anything, so don’t worry if the link is broken for you right now. Because the group is private, learner’s photos won’t show up on the regular Flickr feed, so you retain rights to your photos. For each composition assignment, learners are to comment on at least 3 photos from different classmates with constructive criticism (we discuss the compliment sandwich) in the group. At the end of the course, I will create a slideshow for each learner that features their favorite captured images for them to keep. Anticipated Course Outline: Class 1: Discussing a Growth Mindset and how this contributes to success (accepting critique and using it in a positive way). Composition: Wild; A Class 2: Composition Presentation; Discussing Depth of Field Composition: Light; B Class 3: Composition Presentation; Aperture Composition: Movement; C Class 4: Composition Presentation; Shadows Composition: Still; D Class 5: Composition Presentation; Rule of Thirds Composition: Electric; E Class 6: Composition Presentation; Leading Lines Composition: Edible; F Class 7: Composition Presentation; Negative Space Composition: Emotion; G Class 8: Composition Presentation; Catchlights Composition: Raw; H Class 9: Composition Presentation; Using Flash Composition: Color; I Class 10: Composition Presentation; Sequencing Composition: Monochrome; J Class 11: Composition Presentation; Indoor Photography Composition: Energy; K Class 12: Composition Presentation; Point of View Composition: Subtle; L Class 13: Composition Presentation; Outdoor Photography Composition: Security; M Class 14: Composition Presentation; Perspective Composition: Generations; N Class 15: Composition Presentation; Exposure Composition: Dull; O Class 16: Composition Presentation; Composition Composition: Fluid; P Class 17: Composition Presentation; Annie Leibovitz Composition: Remember; Q Class 18: Composition Presentation; Jimmy Nelson Composition: Forget; R Class 19: Composition Presentation; Rehahn Composition: Modern; S Class 20: Composition Presentation; Steve McCurry Composition: Season; T Class 21: Composition Presentation; Jeremy Cowart Composition: Alive; U Class 22: Composition Presentation; Andrea Gjestvang Composition: Rough; V Class 23: Composition Presentation; Ansel Adams Composition: Delicate; W Class 24: Composition Presentation; Dorthea Lange Composition: Fall; X Class 25: Composition Presentation; Photojournalism Composition: Rise; Y Class 26: Composition Presentation; Open Forum Composition: Choice; Z; homework for this class will be evaluated via the classroom by the teacher only. Class 27: Photo Essay Class 28: Open Forum Required equipment and skill: Learners need a camera. This can be a dSLR, but does not have to be. A cell phone, point and shoot, tablet or other camera is sufficient. Learners will need to access photo editing software. There are free online sites for this and I can link them if needed. You don’t need to purchase software or a camera for this course as long as learners have something that takes photos. Learners do not need a particular skill level to be in this class; a desire to capture the world around them in photos and a love for photography is all that’s necessary to be successful in this course. All skill levels and equipment are welcome. Three options are available. Should you choose the half or 2 week option, you can always re-enroll and finish the course.
Session Dates and Times: Mon May 21, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu May 24, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu May 31, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 4, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 7, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 11, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 14, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 18, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 21, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 25, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 2, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 9, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 16, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jul 19, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jul 26, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 2, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 6, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 9, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 13, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 16, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 27, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 30, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 6, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 10, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 13, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 17, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 20, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 24, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern
Learner's Lenses: Photography Club HALF COURSE
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***Choose to participate in HALF of the full course classes: Weeks 1-7 OR Weeks 8-14*** Photography is visual communication, and young people have a lot to say. In this course, I’ll gently guide them as they say it, and show them the possibilities and provide creative motivation! Meets twice per week, 30 minutes per meeting, for 14 weeks I began shooting about 16 years ago, and have always had a deep love of and comfort for being behind the lens. I’ve been a studio and traveling photographer, and most recently, family/lifestyle portraiture has been my specialty. I didn’t have a Photography Club as a child or teen, and this clubs are something many homeschooling families don’t have access to. So, I decided to use my love of photography to create this course. Members of the Photography Club have a unique and creative eye, capturing images around them. Learners submit their varied images of landscapes, people, and abstracts to share with the class. Some topics are driven by a specific theme or period of time. The shared interest is a love for documenting our amazing world through photography; members always surprise each other with the way they view the world since no one ever takes the same picture. They also hone their craft by exploring topics like framing the photos, cropping, editing, creativity, well-known photographers and so much more. Our goals are to encourage positive reaction to constructive criticism, enhance knowledge of photography and art, engage learners using different themes that appeal to them, elevate their art through exploration and practice, and to help learners truly learn to enjoy photography and all its facets. We will follow this schedule for club assignments and coursework. During classes after our first class, we will have each member present his or her compositions to the class, and as a group, we will give constructive criticism (positive encouragement). We will then discuss our class topic. Homework will be to shoot 5 photos that represent, to the learner, the word assigned. Additionally, learners will shoot 5 different photos to represent the alphabet letter for the class. This is a total of ten photos as homework for each class. All ten final photos should be uploaded to our private Flickr group, and then each learner will choose their best or favorite work for each theme to present to the class, one for the word theme, and one for the alphabet theme. To submit your photos, you’ll create a free Flickr account and join our private group. Until you’ve been added to the group, you won’t be able to see anything, so don’t worry if the link is broken for you right now. Because the group is private, learner’s photos won’t show up on the regular Flickr feed, so you retain rights to your photos. For each composition assignment, learners are to comment on at least 3 photos from different classmates with constructive criticism (we discuss the compliment sandwich) in the group. At the end of the course, I will create a slideshow for each learner that features their favorite captured images for them to keep. Anticipated Course Outline: Class 1: Discussing a Growth Mindset and how this contributes to success (accepting critique and using it in a positive way). Composition: Wild; A Class 2: Composition Presentation; Discussing Depth of Field Composition: Light; B Class 3: Composition Presentation; Aperture Composition: Movement; C Class 4: Composition Presentation; Shadows Composition: Still; D Class 5: Composition Presentation; Rule of Thirds Composition: Electric; E Class 6: Composition Presentation; Leading Lines Composition: Edible; F Class 7: Composition Presentation; Negative Space Composition: Emotion; G Class 8: Composition Presentation; Catchlights Composition: Raw; H Class 9: Composition Presentation; Using Flash Composition: Color; I Class 10: Composition Presentation; Sequencing Composition: Monochrome; J Class 11: Composition Presentation; Indoor Photography Composition: Energy; K Class 12: Composition Presentation; Point of View Composition: Subtle; L Class 13: Composition Presentation; Outdoor Photography Composition: Security; M Class 14: Composition Presentation; Perspective Composition: Generations; N Class 15: Composition Presentation; Exposure Composition: Dull; O Class 16: Composition Presentation; Composition Composition: Fluid; P Class 17: Composition Presentation; Annie Leibovitz Composition: Remember; Q Class 18: Composition Presentation; Jimmy Nelson Composition: Forget; R Class 19: Composition Presentation; Rehahn Composition: Modern; S Class 20: Composition Presentation; Steve McCurry Composition: Season; T Class 21: Composition Presentation; Jeremy Cowart Composition: Alive; U Class 22: Composition Presentation; Andrea Gjestvang Composition: Rough; V Class 23: Composition Presentation; Ansel Adams Composition: Delicate; W Class 24: Composition Presentation; Dorthea Lange Composition: Fall; X Class 25: Composition Presentation; Photojournalism Composition: Rise; Y Class 26: Composition Presentation; Open Forum Composition: Choice; Z; homework for this class will be evaluated via the classroom by the teacher only. Class 27: Photo Essay Class 28: Open Forum Required equipment and skill: Learners need a camera. This can be a dSLR, but does not have to be. A cell phone, point and shoot, tablet or other camera is sufficient. Learners will need to access photo editing software. There are free online sites for this and I can link them if needed. You don’t need to purchase software or a camera for this course as long as learners have something that takes photos. Learners do not need a particular skill level to be in this class; a desire to capture the world around them in photos and a love for photography is all that’s necessary to be successful in this course. All skill levels and equipment are welcome. Three options are available. Should you choose the half or 2 week option, you can always re-enroll and finish the course.
Session Dates and Times: Mon May 21, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu May 24, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu May 31, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 4, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 7, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 11, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 14, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 18, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jun 21, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jun 25, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 2, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 9, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Jul 16, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jul 19, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Jul 26, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 2, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 6, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 9, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 13, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 16, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Aug 27, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Aug 30, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 6, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 10, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 13, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 17, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Thu Sep 20, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern Mon Sep 24, 12:30pm – 1pm Eastern
Cryptozoology: Big Foot, Nessie, and More!
70
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Cryptozoology: Big Foot, Nessie, and More! Image
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 8 weeks. The word cryptozoology means literally the "study of hidden animals”, those which some people believe are out there but science has yet to officially acknowledge. Think of Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster. These mystery creatures (the animals, not your friends) are known as cryptids. Cryptozoology is about finding the big animals, those creatures that many of us believe can’t possibly have gone undiscovered for so long. Some are so bizarre that there must be a supernatural component to their existence. Some are believed to be real animals, yet to be discovered by science. This is a great way to help your children study the unknown. Logically, we haven't seen these therefore we rule them out as absurd. Wouldn’t it be interesting if some of these fantastic tales of bizarre animals proved to be true? And that’s what makes a cryptozoologist get out of bed in the morning. We’re all interested in the possibility of the unknown, but they get out there and look for it. In this course, we will discuss what makes a myth and a legend, and then research live in class each of the cryptids on our list. We will draw comparisons between zoologists and cryptozoologists and then study behavior, structures, and adaptations. Webquests will be provided, and videos, carefully curated links, and more for the 12 cryptids we will study. Each student will complete a research form during class, and then a newspaper article as homework if time is not permitted during our live class.  
Full Year Core Courses
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Project-Based Foundational Math for Lower Elementary: Active Learning Course Image
Project-Based Foundational Math for Lower Elementary: Active Learning Course
Meets for 30 minutes twice per week for 21 weeks. If you’re looking for a fun, interactive, all-inclusive math course for K-3rd grade math, this is it! The activities in this class get your children thinking and behavi... Read More
Schedule:
275
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Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester I Image
Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester I
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, twice per week, for 20 weeks.  If you’re looking for a fun, interactive, all-inclusive math course for grades 4-9 math, this is it! The activities in this class get ... Read More
Schedule:
395
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ELA, Composition, and Literature Upper Elementary Full Year Curriculum Image
ELA, Composition, and Literature Upper Elementary Full Year Curriculum
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, twice per week, for twenty weeks.  This is a comprehensive course for grades 4-7. Older/younger learners may benefit as well; if you’re unsure, ... Read More
Schedule:
375
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ELA & Literature Full Curriculum: Middle School & Early Highschool Image
ELA & Literature Full Curriculum: Middle School & Early Highschool
If you’re looking for an all-inclusive, comprehensive English/Language Arts curriculum for your child, this is it! Literature, writing portfolio, SAT prep, parts of speech, figurative language, poetry, and SO much... Read More
Schedule:
375
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College Preparatory: American Literature Image
College Preparatory: American Literature
Students will gain an understanding of the development of literature and will practice the skills of close literary analysis through evaluative writing. Meets for 50 minutes per meeting, twice per week, for 15 weeks.  Americ... Read More
Schedule:
399
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Upper Grades U.S. History (APUSH) Image
Upper Grades U.S. History (APUSH)
This is a full year of a traditional APUSH (Advanced Placement United States History) level course covered in about 3 months’ time, and is designed to help prepare learners for higher-level courses, or act as a college prep course for the... Read More
Schedule:
355
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Poetry 201: Introduction, Exploration, and Expansion Image
Poetry 201: Introduction, Exploration, and Expansion
Meets for 45 minutes per class, twice per week for 20 weeks. Learners who wish to enroll in 201 and have not completed 101 will need to message me before enrollment. I do this so I can ensure learners have a solid founda... Read More
Schedule:
325
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Gift Certificate Image
Gift Certificate
Looking for a gift that keeps giving? Why not fund education?! With my gift certificates, families can purchase in any amount $10-$500, which can be redeemed for classes, courses, and workshops on my site. Kids already have enough STUFF, so... Read More
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Hogwarts For Muggles
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Welcome to Hogwarts! Image
Welcome to Hogwarts!
Meets once for 90-120 minutes. One of my favorite quotes from Harry Potter is by Dumbledore: “Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if only one remembers to turn on the light.” Many of my learners lov... Read More
Schedule:
10
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Sprout
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Sprout's Herbology
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  Herbology is a mandatory class at Hogwarts for the first five years of a student's education. Students spend class time learning about the different varieties of magical... Read More
Schedule:
129
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Hagrid
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Hagrid's Care of Magical Creatures
Meets for 40 minutes twice per week for 13 weeks. Classification and taxonomy are a very important component to the field and this subject will be the foundation of the course. The class will give learners a general surv... Read More
Schedule:
175
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Burbage
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Burbage's Muggle Studies
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 10 weeks.  In this course, I'll use the HP world to help learners gain an understanding of both physical geography and human geography using a combination of slideshows, videos, pr... Read More
Schedule:
70
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Hogwarts for Muggles: The Ministry of Magic Image
Hogwarts for Muggles: The Ministry of Magic
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 6 weeks. “Civic education is critical,” says Marcie Taylor-Thoma, vice chairperson of the Maryland Commission for Civic Literacy, which was created in 1997 to promote civic educ... Read More
Schedule:
45
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Flitwicks
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Flitwicks' Charms
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 8 weeks.  This is a great course for those who didn't understand grammar previously, those who still get stuck, or those who have never studied grammar before. Our first 8 classes ... Read More
Schedule:
65
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Binns
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Binns' History of Magic
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 8 weeks.  When you hear the words, ‘A History of Magic’, what is immediately conjured up in your mind? Do you think of dusty tomes, full of pictures of witches on broomsticks w... Read More
Schedule:
45
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Hermione Granger
Hogwarts for Muggles: Hermione Granger's Successful Study Skills
Meets once per week for 6 weeks.  Many learners don't have study skills developed just the way they would like. In order to succeed at Hogwarts or in the Muggle world, retention of information is a necessity. During thi... Read More
Schedule:
60
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Snape
Hogwarts for Muggles: Professor Snape's Potions Class
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 11 weeks. At Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Potions is a required subject for students, from first year to fifth year. Potion recipes can be found in many books, includ... Read More
Schedule:
129
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Professor Vector
Professor Vector's Arithmancy Class (Numbers and Logic)
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  Arithmancy is one of Hermione’s favorite subjects at Hogwarts because it is a very precise, measurable, and almost scientific method of understanding the world around ... Read More
Schedule:
65
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Professor Lupin
Professor Lupin's Defense Against the Dark Arts
Meets for 45 minutes once per week for 6 weeks.  What is a Dementor? “Dementors are among the foulest creatures that walk this earth. They infest the darkest, filthiest places, they glory in decay and despair, they dr... Read More
Schedule:
60
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Professor Trelawney
Professor Trelawney's Divination Class
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 6 weeks.  Divination is an elective course taught at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It teaches methods of divining the future, or gathering insights into future events... Read More
Schedule:
40
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Hogwarts for Muggles: The Psychology of Harry Potter Image
Hogwarts for Muggles: The Psychology of Harry Potter
Meets for 45 minutes per week for 4 weeks.  Students will learn basic concepts across three areas of psychology including: social psychology, child development and learning. Using psychology articles, the characters and... Read More
Schedule:
55
One-Time Classes
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Fusion, Fission, and Nuclear Power: Exploring the Chernobyl Disaster Image
Fusion, Fission, and Nuclear Power: Exploring the Chernobyl Disaster
Meets once for 70-80 minutes. Chernobyl is a town in Ukraine, however, when people remember Chernobyl, it is usually in reference to the Chernobyl nuclear accident. This nuclear accident in 1986 is considered to be the w... Read More
Schedule:
10
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Microfiction: Fiction in a Flash! Image
Microfiction: Fiction in a Flash!
Meets once for 60 minutes. This fun creative writing class shows pre-teens and teens that an entire story can be written in just two sentences. A part of the brainstorming and writing process for many writers, a microfic... Read More
Schedule:
10
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Minibeasts: Creepy Crawly Friends Image
Minibeasts: Creepy Crawly Friends
Meets once for 45-60 minutes. Minibeasts are small animals that do not have an internal skeleton. In this class, we will learn about the habitats, habits, diet, and more for these minibeasts: -Butterfly -Spider -Ant... Read More
Schedule:
10
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NASA and the Great Space Race Image
NASA and the Great Space Race
Meets one time for 70-90 minutes.  This short crash-course will discuss some of N.A.S.A.'s most famous accomplishments including Project Mercury, Project Gemini, Project Apollo (especially Apollo 8 and Apollo 11) the sp... Read More
Schedule:
10
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Owl Pellet Dissection and Discussion-Live Lab! Image
Owl Pellet Dissection and Discussion-Live Lab!
Meets once for 90 minutes-2 hours. A brief break will be taken.  Owls are birds of prey, and one of the things they eat are small animals. After an owl eats the small rodents, birds, and bugs that are a part of its nigh... Read More
Schedule:
20
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Board Games Online: Once Upon a Time (Storytelling) Image
Board Games Online: Once Upon a Time (Storytelling)
This is a class based on the the tabletop card game Once Upon a Time which can be seen here: http://a.co/2Owplsb You do NOT need to purchase the game for this class; I have the game, and will present cards to each player. For this versio... Read More
Schedule:
10
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Christmas Around the World! Image
Christmas Around the World!
Meets once for 60-90 minutes. This one-hour class will cover info on the Santa figure for each country below, as well as holiday foods, traditions, and decorations: *America *Australia *Brazil *Germany *Italy *Ja... Read More
Schedule:
10
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Book Club: Booktalks for Upper Elementary and Middle School Image
Book Club: Booktalks for Upper Elementary and Middle School
Meets for 45-60 minutes once per month. This is a drop-in club, so students will enroll each month they'd like to attend. This class has a minimum of 5 students per meeting to encourage conversation and sharing.  ... Read More
Schedule:
8
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Yummy Chemistry: Candy pH Testing-LIVE LAB! Image
Yummy Chemistry: Candy pH Testing-LIVE LAB!
Meets once for 90 minutes.  In this class, students will learn the vocabulary terms: acid, base, alkaline, pH, pH scale. Students will participate in developing a working hypothesis for the outcome of this lab. We will ... Read More
Schedule:
12
Professional Development Workshops for Parent-Teachers
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Executive Function Skills 101: Workshop for Parents Image
Executive Function Skills 101: Workshop for Parents
Meets once for 90 minutes-2 hours Executive function is a set of mental processes that helps us connect past experience with present action. People use it to perform activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing,... Read More
Schedule:
25
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Executive Function Skills for Adults Image
Executive Function Skills for Adults
Meets for 70-90 minutes once per week for 12 weeks These seven executive function skills are critical in managing everyday life and long-term goals: Self-awareness: Simply put, this is self-directed attentio... Read More
Schedule:
225
Semester Courses
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Young Scientists: Early Elementary Image
Young Scientists: Early Elementary
Meets for 30 minutes per meeting, three times per week, for 18 weeks. In this semester-long course, we will break down the following to the most basic levels for young learners: forces, weather, machines, and engineering... Read More
Schedule:
275
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Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science-Semester I Image
Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science-Semester I
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, three times per week, for 15 weeks.  If you’re looking for an all-inclusive course for grades 5-9 science, this is it! The activities in this class get your children thinking and beha... Read More
Schedule:
349
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Young Historians: Upper Elementary Social Studies/U.S. History Image
Young Historians: Upper Elementary Social Studies/U.S. History
Meets twice per week, 45 minutes per meeting, for 16 weeks.  I’ll incorporate videos, slideshows, games, books, and written work. This is a complete, comprehensive course that covers everything a you... Read More
Schedule:
295
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Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 1) Image
Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 1)
Meets for one hour, once per week, for 10 weeks. Dungeons & Dragons is not just a role-playing game, it’s an educational RPG! Dungeons & Dragons helps the players build academic skills like reading and writing,... Read More
Schedule:
149
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Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 2) Image
Dungeons and Dragons: Using Role Playing Games for Education (Level 2)
Meets for 90 minutes once per week for 16 weeks. If learners have not already taken Level 1, they need to have extensive experience playing live with 5th edition and homebrew games, have an understanding of races/classes... Read More
Schedule:
249
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The Hunger Games Book 1 Novel Study Image
The Hunger Games Book 1 Novel Study
Meets once per week for 14 weeks The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins is a fantastic novel about a 16-year old girl named Katniss who volunteers to take her younger sister’s place in a government-mandated competition wh... Read More
Schedule:
140
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Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science: Semester 2 Image
Upper Elementary and Middle School Foundational Science: Semester 2
Meets for one hour twice per week for 16 weeks.  This course is specifically designed for grades 5-9. Disciplines of Science covered include: Earth Science Ecology Physics ... Read More
Schedule:
349
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Pre-Algebra: Semester I Image
Pre-Algebra: Semester I
Meets for one hour twice per week for 20 weeks. This course has a prerequisite, which you can find ... Read More
Schedule:
400
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Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester II Image
Project-Based Foundational Math for Upper Elementary: Active Learning Course Semester II
Meets for 45 minutes per meeting, three days per week, for 20 weeks.  If you’re looking for a fun, interactive, all-inclusive math course for grades 6-9 math, this is it! The activities in this class... Read More
Schedule:
450
Single-Subject Mastery Courses
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Executive Functions: Beginner
Executive Functions: Beginner's Course for Little Learners
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 12 weeks. Executive functioning skills are the basis for planning, organizing, initiating, and following through with all tasks, assignments, and problems inside and outside of scho... Read More
Schedule:
129
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Executive Functions, Study Skills, and Goal Setting for Pre-Teens and Teens Image
Executive Functions, Study Skills, and Goal Setting for Pre-Teens and Teens
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 15 weeks. The executive functions are a set of processes that all have to do with managing oneself and one’s resources in order to achieve a goal. It is an umbrella term for the n... Read More
Schedule:
189
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Poetry 101: Elements-A Complete Unit Image
Poetry 101: Elements-A Complete Unit
Meets for 45 minutes once per week for 10 weeks. I’ve prepared a PowerPoint presentation that provides in-depth analysis of each of aspect of poetry. We will use this for each of the first 4 classes. Each of these clas... Read More
Schedule:
70
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Executive Function Skills: At Your Own Pace Image
Executive Function Skills: At Your Own Pace
The executive functions are a set of processes that all have to do with managing oneself and one’s resources in order to achieve a goal. It is an umbrella term for the neurologically-based skills involving mental ... Read More
Schedule:
129
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Learner
Learner's Lenses: Photography Club FULL COURSE
Photography is visual communication, and young people have a lot to say. In this course, I’ll gently guide them as they say it, and show them the p... Read More
Schedule:
165
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Intro to Anthropology: Socratic-Style Course Image
Intro to Anthropology: Socratic-Style Course
Meets for 45 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  Anthropology is the study of what makes us human. Anthropologists take a broad approach to understanding the many different aspects of the human experience, which we cal... Read More
Schedule:
90
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Hogwarts for Muggles: Harry Potter Cooking Club Image
Hogwarts for Muggles: Harry Potter Cooking Club
Meets for 45-60 minutes once per week for 8 weeks. Each school year at Hogwarts begins with a celebratory meal in its cavernous Great Hall. No doubt those magnificent meals left an indelible impression on a young Harry, ... Read More
Schedule:
75
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Executive Functions 101: Workshop for Students Image
Executive Functions 101: Workshop for Students
Meets once for 75-90 minutes.  If you or your child are concerned that your child may have Executive Function weaknesses or deficits, please join me for this short workshop. We will discuss the EF skills (planning, orga... Read More
Schedule:
15
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The Riveting Renaissance: Socratic Method Course Image
The Riveting Renaissance: Socratic Method Course
Meets for one hour once per week for 12 weeks. The Socratic Method is at the heart of critical thinking, and is a powerful tool to inspire students to take a deep interest in their own enthusiastically willful education ... Read More
Schedule:
99
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Debate Club: Teaching Critical Thinking, Logic, and Tolerance Image
Debate Club: Teaching Critical Thinking, Logic, and Tolerance
Meets for one hour, once per week, for 12 weeks. The format for this course is inspired by the International Debate Education Association, which focuses on education, not competition, a... Read More
Schedule:
149
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Replacing Reluctance with Optimism: Working with a Growth Mindset Image
Replacing Reluctance with Optimism: Working with a Growth Mindset
Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 4 weeks. Children can develop a growth mindset at an early age, and it is our job as educators to promote a growth mindset as much as possible. If we miss the opportunity, they may ... Read More
Schedule:
40
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Psychology: Nature, Nurture, and Human Diversity Image
Psychology: Nature, Nurture, and Human Diversity
Meets for one hour, once per week, for six weeks. Maybe you got your green eyes from your mother, and your freckles from your father. But where did you get your thrill-seeking personality and talent for singing? Did you ... Read More
Schedule:
60
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Psychology 101: Introduction to Psychology Image
Psychology 101: Introduction to Psychology
Meets for one hour once per week for 4 weeks, ages 12-18 The American Psychological Association defines Psychology as “the study of the mind and behavior. The discipline embraces all aspects of the human experience—f... Read More
Schedule:
40
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The Salem Witch Trials: Socratic Method/Active Learning Course for Tweens/Teens Image
The Salem Witch Trials: Socratic Method/Active Learning Course for Tweens/Teens
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 4 weeks. This course is not a lecture, and depends heavily on discussion! I'll introduce the Socratic method to learners in the first class. Then, I'll use slideshows, photos, video... Read More
Schedule:
45
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Adulting: Meal Planning 101 Image
Adulting: Meal Planning 101
Meets for 30 minutes twice per week for 5 weeks. When it comes to eating well, meal planning is one of the easiest things you can do to set yourself up for success. The key is just to start, and to set aside a little bit... Read More
Schedule:
65
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Stink and the Midnight Zombie Walk: Novel Study, Creative Writing, and Slime! Image
Stink and the Midnight Zombie Walk: Novel Study, Creative Writing, and Slime!
Is your child ready for their first novel study? While this class is NOT limited to just first-timers, only the living may attend-no undead allowed! Come learn about Stink, the little brother of Judy Moody, and do some fun, non-scary Zombie... Read More
Schedule:
45
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Spy School is in Session: Liar and Spy Novel Study and More! Image
Spy School is in Session: Liar and Spy Novel Study and More!
Meets twice per week, 40 minutes per meeting, for 4 weeks.  Georges (the s is silent) was just a normal 7th grader at a normal middle school in the normal suburb of Brooklyn. But, when he and his parents move i... Read More
Schedule:
60
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Daring Dragons: The Storm Dragon Novel Study and More Image
Daring Dragons: The Storm Dragon Novel Study and More
Novel studies can be dry and boring, or fun & engaging! Join me for the latter as we explore the world of storm dragons while learning about character traits, context clues, plus vocabulary & comprehension q... Read More
Schedule:
60
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Unicorns Galore! The Sky Novel Study and More Image
Unicorns Galore! The Sky Novel Study and More
Novel studies can be dry and boring, or fun & engaging! Join me for the latter as we explore the world of unicorns while learning about character traits, context clues, plus vocabulary & comprehension questions–complete with a uni... Read More
Schedule:
60
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Don't Let The Undead Get Ahead: Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse (or Other Disaster)
While a zombie apocalypse might seem unlikely, you never know when necessary survival skills will come in handy, so let’s learn some just in case! Meets for 30-40 minutes once per week for 12 weeks.  In this unit study, we... Read More
Schedule:
99
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Learner
Learner's Lenses: Photography Club 2-WEEK COURSE
***Choose TWO WEEKS of this full course.*** Photography is visual communication, and young people have a lot to say. In this course, I’ll gently guide them as they say it, and show them the possibilities and provide creative motivation... Read More
Schedule:
25
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Learner
Learner's Lenses: Photography Club HALF COURSE
***Choose to participate in HALF of the full course classes: Weeks 1-7 OR Weeks 8-14*** Photography is visual communication, and young people have a lot to say. In this course, I’ll gently guide them as they say it, and show them the p... Read More
Schedule:
85
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Cryptozoology: Big Foot, Nessie, and More! Image
Cryptozoology: Big Foot, Nessie, and More!
Meets for 40 minutes once per week for 8 weeks. The word cryptozoology means literally the "study of hidden animals”, those which some people believe are out there but science has yet to officially acknowledge... Read More
Schedule:
70
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