Replacing Reluctance with Optimism: Working with a Growth Mindset

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$40.00

Children can develop a growth mindset at an early age, and it is our job as educators to promote a growth mindset as much as possible. If we miss the opportunity, they may not adopt this valuable characteristic.

Description

Meets for 30 minutes once per week for 4 weeks.

Children can develop a growth mindset at an early age, and it is our job as educators to promote a growth mindset as much as possible. If we miss the opportunity, they may not adopt this valuable characteristic.

Growth mindset is the exact opposite of a fixed mindset. If a child has a fixed mindset, they believe they cannot change their character, creativity, or potential for success. A person with a fixed mindset believes that his or her intelligence is static, while a person with a growth mindset believes that his or her intelligence can be developed. The latter group is thus more likely to embrace challenges, persist in the face of setbacks, and see effort as a natural path to mastery. The distinction between these two extremes has tremendous implications for motivation, productivity, and confidence; in the pursuit of success, mindset is everything. A growth mindset has a more positive outlook, as a child believes he/she has control over their successes and failures. If a child possesses a growth mindset, they can look at classroom tasks with a “go-getter” attitude and are able to bounce back from challenges with an optimistic point of view. When they fail at something they understand that they can use that experience to learn new ways to achieve growth towards a goal.

During each class, we will celebrate success, minimize failures, celebrate the successes of others, and work to view failure as a learning opportunity. We will use the words “persistent, confident, capable” often. This class is specifically designed for students who feel down and sometimes even hopeless or incapable when faced with challenges. A growth mindset is truly necessary for success, and I would really, really love to share what I’ve done with and modeled to my family and students because I know this works, and I know this creates confident students!

Schedule

Fri Jan 11, 2019, 11:30am – 12pm Eastern
Fri Jan 18, 2019, 11:30am – 12pm Eastern
Fri Jan 25, 2019, 11:30am – 12pm Eastern
Fri Feb 1, 2019, 11:30am – 12pm Eastern

Anticipated Course Outline

During our first class, we will discuss the differences between a growth and a fixed mindset, and how mindsets affect everything around us. I will give learners a challenge with each class, and our first challenge will be to notice when we recognize this newly-discovered trait.

Our second class will begin with a short discussion about our challenge. We will then discuss obstacles, and how we feel when we encounter them. We will discuss specific examples from each learner, and then discuss together how we overcome them. A coordinating challenge will follow.

We will begin Class 3 with our challenge discussion, and then, it’s all about accepting constructive criticism. This is often a hard thing for adults and young people alike. We will talk about what opportunities are presented to us when we’re graced with constructive criticism, and then I’ll challenge students to listen to the constructive criticism they’re given in other parts of their lives.

Our fourth and final class is about perseverance. Students need to learn early on that learning new things does not come easy. I will teach them what this big and powerful word means through class discussions, sharing examples, and praising them for their efforts. Encourage students to not give up when things get hard and tell them that if they can’t do something now, it doesn’t mean they never will. Say “You can’t do this YET, but keep going!” The word YET is a powerful one.

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